Thread: Nice Video...
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Old 02-03-2005, 09:36 AM   #22
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Re: Nice Video...

Here's our take on ushiro-waza:

Ushiro-waza, or "rear techniques," are not a venture into self-defense scenario training any more than katate-dori is such a venture.  As katate-dori involves a martial honing of the body/mind by providing a tactile reference to the quality of one's martial attributes in the wrist-grab, ushiro-waza also cultivates a martial honing of the body/mind but by alternate means.  More than techniques from the front, ushiro-waza addresses the ever-changing dynamic of combat by allowing for more varied relationships to manifest themselves between uke's and nage's paths of action.  That is to say, the combination of vectors concerning things like Angles of Attack and Angles of Deviation become multitudinous within the very same engagement.  This abundance allows for an inexhaustible diversity that pressures the binary logic of the beginning practitioner to succumb to the fact that there should not be nor need be a front or back in combat, that there should not be nor need be a right or left in combat, that there should not be nor need be a near or far in combat, that there should not be nor need be an inside or outside in combat, etc.  Through spiraling tactical architectures, via ushiro-waza the aikidoka is to explore the various vector-to-vector relationships that are probable and possible as well as the tactical responses that are valid within an ever-changing situation that will always be void of any kind of two-dimensional orientation for that very reason.  Like katate-dori, the various grabs associated with ushiro-waza (e.g. ryote-dori, eri-dori, ryokata-dori, etc.) provide tactile sensors and/or stressors by which the quality of one's technique (i.e. the level at which a martial concept is embodied) can be measured and further cultivated.

David M. Valadez
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