Thread: No Touch Throws
View Single Post
Old 01-15-2005, 12:49 PM   #119
mriehle
 
mriehle's Avatar
Dojo: New School Aikido
Location: Stockton, CA
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 320
United_States
Offline
Re: No Touch Throws

Quote:
Steve Rice wrote:
aikido and judo are not very much alike. they work on 2 completely different principals.
Quote:
Mike Gallo wrote:
So how are they completely different? [...snip...] It seems to me that they'll share many principles even if they use different techniques.
How's this for a completely ridiculous way to look at it:

You're both right and you're both wrong.

I'm not an expert in Judo, but you don't grow up with a dad like mine (who is) and not have some understanding of how Judo works.

So, they work on exactly the same principles. You know, that Newton thing someone else mentioned. Fascinating how it keeps popping up in martial arts practice. You just can't escape physics. It's almost like it's an inherent part of the universe or something.

They look and work completely differently. This is a function of technique in applying the same fundamental principles, though, and at higher levels the differences start to become increasingly obscure.

The real difference is attitude. If you believe that Judo is not about competition first and foremost you just aren't paying attention. Aikido should never be (okay, sometimes it is anyway, but let's keep things at the level of ideals here for a moment).

You're not going to see No Touch throws in Judo, because of the competitiveness. It's difficult, off the top of my head, to explain why, but it's obvious if you ever work with a reasonably accomplished judoka. A start would be that a No Touch throw does, in fact, rely on leading your partner and in a competitive situation your partner will be - by definition - on alert for that kind of leading. This is different from the so-called "street conflict" in that the more impromptu nature of the latter tends to lead to more committed, less cautious attacks that are often actually easier to defend against (although, it's not uncommon for mistakes to be more costly, knives and stuff affect this, you know).

  Reply With Quote