Thread: Aikido Frauds
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Old 01-05-2005, 02:28 AM   #219
mriehle
 
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Dojo: New School Aikido
Location: Stockton, CA
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 320
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Dojo Reviews

Quote:
Roque Bevilacqua wrote:
If we do not compite in our training, why should the dojos compite for students? I think that competence would be oppossite to Aikido spirit.
Yes. I see your point. Competition is inevitable any time there are two or more providers of similar services in a given area. But I wouldn't like to be an instrument used in cutthroat tactics.

Quote:
Roque Bevilacqua wrote:
In fact, I think everyone of us take Aikido in a different way, so what is extremely good for you maybe is not so for me. Even in a dojo, teachers may be quite different at teaching.
Hmmm...

Another good point. I'd hazard, though, that the one who really matters from the standpoint of a review is the head instructor. It would be nice to mention the others in the sense of "well, they're pretty good too" or "not quite up to the standard the head instructor sets", but you'd want to avoid saying too much about them, I think.

Quote:
Roque Bevilacqua wrote:
Don't get me wrong, I think reviews are good, but I think they should be managed carefully.
Absolutely. I tried to imply that in my original comments on the subject. Mainly, I think, standards need to be observed.

Okay, now it sounds like I'm making work for somebody. I hate doing that when I know I can't be that somebody. And I can't for two reasons:

1) I'm plain not qualified. Simple as that. And if that weren't enough...

2) I run a school. Granted, I do so under the approval of my teacher*, but it still seems like a conflict of interest.

Quote:
Roque Bevilacqua wrote:
I don't think reviews would help the beginner to chose. Because the reviews are inmerse in the "martial arts world" and the most inocent beginner does not. So he/she would not have access to them.
Another good point. But this is one of the reasons I think it's important for such reviews to be readily available on the web and for schools to be encouraged to link to them. People do a lot of research on the web these days before committing to stuff. Not always as much as they should. But that brings us back to the "small action" argument again.



* He'd be within his moral rights, if not necessarily legal ones to yank my right to run the school anytime he felt it was appropriate. Strictly speaking I don't have the rank to be a dojo cho. But I'm told I'm a good teacher and I maintain close ties with the home dojo in order to make sure we keep standards up. And I'm working on that rank thing...

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