Thread: Ukemi styles
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Old 05-07-2001, 01:17 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally posted by jimvance

The way I am taught, uke has two objectives; give a committed attack and stay dangerous. Resistance exercises are not one of those choices.
If you are not resisting, you are cooperating. How do you stay dangerous while you are cooperating?

Quote:

Speed and strength are variables that everyone should be trying to work out of their practice.
Have you ever told your uke they are too fast and strong when they attacked you? How did they respond? I am talking about students with a few years experience here, not rank beginners.

Quote:

If you practice in a way that ignores the threat of atemi, you are just doing a form of Asian folk dancing.
This is true, but it is also true if you pretend every tap is a knockout blow, which I think is a more common habit among aikidoka. Again, I am not talking about brand new students.

Quote:

If you think that resisting a technique creates stronger renshu, you will eventually hurt yourself and others. If you add speed, strength and resistance to your training, only certain types of people will come to train with you. Think of surfing. Do surfers resist a wave? No, they ride a wave. Good surfers ride really, really big waves. What are the chances of them resisting the force of the water propelling them forward?
I don't like this as a combat analogy, because the wave keeps moving along regardless of what you do. I have never been so lucky as to meet an attacker who, as I step to the side, keeps attacking the air in front of them. Have you?

If a wave turned to follow you around, you would not be able to resist. But human attackers, even big, fast, strong ones, are not waves.
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