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Old 02-01-2001, 07:14 AM   #17
Guest5678
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 135
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Quote:
Jim23 wrote:
Dan,

Excellent points.

My opinion is that a little sparring (even with restrictions) would wake a few people up and make them better prepared to deal a real physical confrontation.

That way thay get to experience/learn both sides.

It's a bit like your boxing (but different), you get to understand if your punch has any effect on your opponent and just how strong or weak people are.

If you try to throw someone much stronger or quicker, who is resisting, you'll quickly find out if your technique works and what technique works for you.

It only makes sense to me. But let's not brawl.

Jim23
Jim23,

Thanks, I really like working with people who can kick. I never learned to kick very well and I admire those with that ability. We have a couple guys here that are extremely fast, hard kickers. No flash either, just hard linear shots to just about every soft spot on your body. REALLY good test of your irimi AND tenkan abilities! Also, if you miss the timing at all, you may require a few minutes to get your breath back! Hate when that happens.

None of this activity however, is ever viewed as "competing" by either party. We consider it just another aspect of our training. Most of these people are cross training in different arts and we feel both participants benefit greatly. Personally, I feel this type of training (obviously at various speeds and intensities) should be considered a regular part of everyones training. NOT competing, but sparring with a real intention of learning something.

I've also discovered that my Aikido looks and feels much different under these conditions. Things happen much faster and technique doesn't look nearly as good as when doing "repetition training" with a cooperative uke. It has also taught me the importance of atemi!

The other reason I favor this type work is that your working with more common attacks. For example, you get punches instead of Shomenuchi. Backfists, elbows, knees, feet and any combination thereof. This is great training that a lot of people miss out on. It does however, require a bit more control. Thats why I really value my time with the "more experienced" training partner. I get hit more often, but they have much better control of their power.........

Regards,
Dan P. - Mongo
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