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Old 01-31-2001, 09:21 AM   #10
Guest5678
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 135
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Relax, there is no true competition here.

I really enjoy sparring with people that have different MA backgrounds. This can only help if done with the right intention. I do not compete in Aikido however, because even at the highest level of training you cannot execute the techniques you might really want to without causing serious injury.

When competing in boxing for example, I pull out all the stops. The idea is to dominate your opponent from the start and knock him out. That's the name of the game. This means I can use ANY "Boxing" technique in my toolbox to accomplish this goal. I'm giving 100% and hopefully my opponent is also. We both accept the risk of injury here. Yes, there are rules in boxing as well however, the rules here do not prevent me from executing ANY of my "boxing" techniques. The same cannot be said for martial arts competition.

You cannot go 100% in Aikido (or other martial arts) competition without someone getting seriously injured or perhaps killed. Therefore, a true measure of ones ability will never be realized while competing. True "competition" is not allowed. I feel the same about "sport Judo". The Olympic committee had to strip techniques from Judo to prevent people from getting seriously injured while "competing". Is this then really Judo that they are competing in? Some say yes, some say no. To me, this would be the same as the boxing commision ruling that you can no longer use left hooks to the head because too many people have suffered injury. As soon as you put restrictions on the use of technique you limit that persons true abilities. "Competition" then becomes some watered down activity that does not allow the participants to realize their full potential. Personally, I choose not to "compete" in martial arts because of these limits. Even if we could go all out, I wouldn't want to risk that kind of injury to me or my opponent.........

Sam: I don't think anyone said anything about Tomiki sensei being wrong here. This is just a matter of semantics regarding the word "competition". Most people interpret the word as meaning someone trying to "best" another, however, in regard to YOUR style of training, it has a totally different meaning...... not unlike many Japanese terms.....


Just another view,

Dan P. - Mongo

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