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Old 10-24-2013, 07:49 PM   #99
CorkyQ
Dojo: Kakushi Toride Aikido
Location: Los Angeles
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 103
United_States
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Re: "IP/IT/IS" vs technique?

The thing with "IP" training is that the real education is not in theory but in how it feels. If a person hasn't felt the difference between relying on technique proficiency and using ki, that person will have little frame of reference.

I start seminars by attacking everyone present. Even beginners usually can demonstrate a technique with reasonable proficiency. After being thrown a few dozen times I then attack each participant with authentic attack energy at a moderate intensity but full intention, rather than my 20-year trained way of "taking ukemi" and suddenly there is no aikido - and this is from people who have been training for decades.

Bear in mind that the attack I am giving each of my partners is fully "aikido-able" (I am not "defending" against their throw) but what usually happens after the initial panic the moment their systems register that this feels nothing like aikido practice ukemi, they usually either try to force me through their chosen technique or give it up altogether.

What anyone cares to get out of their practice is none of my business, but for me, the essence of aikido was not being learned while my techniques did not result in effortless (harmonious) manifestation of aiki when attacked with authentic intention. Once I began training a different way it changed everything - I learned how much I thought about aikido was actually missing the point, and how much of the beneficial aspect of aikido I was not receiving only training in the traditional way.

The hardest part was starting over after twenty years, unlearning old habits and techniques, and approaching aikido with a whole new set of guidelines. For me that meant breaking away from the traditional ways and my semi-traditional dojo and seeking a different path on my own. Luckily for me I made my way to Sunadomari Sensei who affirmed my path as well as saying this in an interview (translated from Japanese to French to English, but I understand this to be accurate based on what I took away from our meeting): You can create your own techniques. If you understand the basics you can create techniques to infinity, we do not need someone to come teach us. We then see the wonderful beauty of Aikido.
If you do not understand even a single technique of Aikido all variations born spontaneously.
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