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Old 04-17-2013, 10:46 AM   #13
Mert Gambito
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 189
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Re: Can we see that aikido is all over the place in MMA?

Quote:
Richard Stevens wrote: View Post
This highlights my fundamental confusions as the concept seems to be surrounded by ambiguity. Maybe it is misinterpretation on my part, but I have read it implied that "aiki" cannot be cultivated by simply training for years. Specific training methods need to be followed and they require guidance.

If this is true then how can someone who hasn't utilized those training methods or had any sort of guidance have developed "aiki" skills that can be utilized in combat sports?

Or is it simply that there is a baseline level of "aiki" that naturally develops as a result of years of training and the only way to expand those skills is through focused training methods similar to those taught by Dan Harden or Howard Popkin?

It's seems like there are two opposing definitions of aiki. A pedestrian non-opposition of force and something more esoteric.
Richard, et al;

The apparent dichotomy won't be resolved. The dichotomy exists even within Daito-ryu, the parent of most gendai aiki-budo. On one hand, Katsayuki Kondo paints aiki as a tactical force multiplier that relies on timing and atemi (source: What Is Aiki?). On the other hand, Yukioshi Sagawa is clear that it is a body skill primarily developed through solo exercises (source: Transparent Power).

One way to reconcile, if not resolve, the dichotomy is to consider timing and atemi as inherently in play, at the moment of touch, by someone adept at aiki as a body skill.

As for Anderson Silva, count me in as a big fan too. However, I'm curious how he would do in a static push test while relaxed in shizentai or on one foot against a fully committed pusher/uke, with the only point of contact between the parties being where the push is occurring. If those assigned the "aiki proficient" tag by those who've trained with them are known to use their aiki to profound effect whether in motion against motion (to Dan Richards' points in the OP) or motion-in-stillness against motion, e.g. Sagawa and Koichi Tohei in the past, Dan Harden and Howard Popkin (vetted as recently as a few days ago here on AikiWeb) in the present -- all proponents of solo exercises / aiki-taiso (as was O-Sensei) -- then you'd expect similar abilities in others assigned the tag. Well, maybe Steven Seagal has Silva doing torifune and circling a jo overhead, and it's just not documented on YouTube.

Quote:
Richard Stevens wrote: View Post
Or is it simply that there is a baseline level of "aiki" that naturally develops as a result of years of training and the only way to expand those skills is through focused training methods similar to those taught by Dan Harden or Howard Popkin?
This has historically been Dan's take re: training in certain Daito-ryu lineages, e.g. Roppokai; with Howard as an exponent of developing a notable baseline of ability through waza training, and waza serving as a tool too burn in conditioning and skills best honed through solo training. Did Howard weigh in regarding this notion when you met him?

Last edited by Mert Gambito : 04-17-2013 at 10:54 AM.

Mert
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