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Old 01-29-2013, 03:45 AM   #55
Michael Varin
Dojo: Aikido of Fresno
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 567
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Re: A simple mechanical model of body use.

Quote:
Phi Truong wrote: View Post
being meaning to respond to this, but was tied up and no, nobody practiced hojojutsu on me. it would only encourage me to be bad.

the significant of the study for me, besides the inefficiency of the amateur muscle usage, was that Kuroda sensei using a slight different set of muscle to do certain thing. sure, some are overlap, but not all. in the previous thread which this thread spawned from, where i gave example of picking up the spoon. before i mentioned it, did you thought of getting underneath the spoon and push it up? as mentioned many times before, that IP/IS involved lots mental aspect because it follows this principle "desire leads mind. mind lead chi/ki. chi/ki leads motions" notice the mind part. if your mind form an imagery to make your body to activate various muscle groups, it depends on the imagery, your body activates different muscle groups, wouldn't you agree? for me, when i pick up the spoon, i activate the same group of muscle as i would picking up a large sack of potato on the floor. and yes, we already talked about efficiency and my answer was referencing the thread where Vlad mentioned about different set of responds. this is really about the "do", i.e. being versus doing. as an experiment, you can ask friends and neighbors and any athletic, including olympic class, to pickup the spoon. then ask them afterward, did they thought of getting underneath and push it up?
you would think, what different would that make? it makes the whole world of different. it's how IP/IS folks use their mind to direct their body to perform a function.

the other example i mentioned was about punch in the stomach. does trained folks crunch their stomach muscles or "inflate" them? i mentioned that i used to crunch, but now inflate, i.e. the balloon man model. ask boxers if they crunch or inflate?

here is another thought to mull over. a push is a pull in the other direction, i.e. a push in the front = full from the back. and experiment to try, when someone pushes you from the front, try focusing on resisting a same pull from the back and ignore the push. ask a linebacker if he/she/it focus on the push in front or the pull from the back? and yes, they do train to pull heavy things, but did they do it when there is a push from the front?
Phi,

This was an incoherent response to my post.

You are capable of better thought than that.

Why even post the Kuroda Tetsuzan link if you are unable to offer at least a rudimentary explanation of what you believe he is doing?

Quote:
Phi Truong wrote:
as mentioned many times before, that IP/IS involved lots mental aspect because it follows this principle "desire leads mind. mind lead chi/ki. chi/ki leads motions" notice the mind part. if your mind form an imagery to make your body to activate various muscle groups, it depends on the imagery, your body activates different muscle groups, wouldn't you agree?
Do you think that these things are not present in "external" movement/training? Can that even be so?

I keep hearing that there is such a gap between "internal" and "external," but there seems to be a failure to identify and describe those distinctions. Why is that so?

Quote:
Phi Truong wrote:
simple mechanic such as lifting something isn't simple in IP/IS point of view. From IP/IS point view, we have a number of requirements that we follow

1. one moves, all move
2. dealing with force in one direction, one must also deal with forces apply in all directions: front, back, left, right, up and down, at all time.
3. 1 & 2 don't mean you sacrifice mobility
4. heart leads mind. mind leads chi/ki. chi/ki leads motions.
5. breath power is a must, not a nice to have. and i don't mean sucking winds to live or onion breath.

Those are some of the foundational things that govern IP/IS process.
Making a list of conclusory statements is easy. It is also unhelpful.

Where are the explanations and analysis? How are these qualities/things absent in "external"?

If you are unable to clearly make distinctions, how do you know if they actually exist?

-Michael
"Through aiki we can feel the mind of the enemy who comes to attack and are thus able to respond immediately." - M. Mochizuki
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