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Old 01-28-2013, 11:11 PM   #46
ChrisHein
 
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Dojo: Aikido of Fresno
Location: Fresno , CA
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 1,638
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Re: Int. Vs. Ext - resisting a push

To me, it sounds like there are many different people calling what they do 'internal', yet they all have hugely different ideas about what is going on.

Some people believe you do use local muscles groups. Some people think you don't. some people think you start with local muscle groups but then stop using them. Some people seem to think that connective tissue is producing force. Some people think that they can be stable in all directions at once, some people don't. It goes on and on.

Until there is a general consensus about what is meant by the word 'internal' it's silly to keep talking about it. We should just be talking about the problem, as simply as possible, and work our way out from there.
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The problem:
Force is coming into the body. How do we best deal with that force once it's in the body?

What things help us, what things make it harder to deal with the force?
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My theory on solving this problem:
I believe, that aligning (see diagram) your body to the force makes for the best possible solution. It requires the least amount of muscle, by letting skeleton to take some of the force.

To me, not using good alignment to the force (see diagram) would require more muscle then not aligning to the force.
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Further questions:
If you don't align to the force, how are you not using more muscle?

If you align in some way that isn't using skeletal alignment, how are you doing that?

Do you believe there is something inside of your body that is capable of making force that is not a muscle?

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