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Old 12-03-2012, 07:44 PM   #28
Kevin Leavitt
 
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Dojo: Aikido of Northern Virginia
Location: Stuttgart, Baden Wurttemberg
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 4,376
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Re: For those who wonder how to use aikido against fast punching

Conditioning is an obvious factor and something we should all do to the best of our ability. However, it is not everything and in "real fighting" it is not the highest priority. Fight Management is what is paramount to everything. That is, knowing how to manage yourself efficiently in the high stress environment.

I have trained highly conditioned Special Operators that have gassed out rapidly in like 30 seconds because of poor fight management skills. The problem is fights tend to be highly anaerobic versus aerobic. The problem with anaerobic is that it is hard to create a sustainable threshold so an decently conditioned person is not that far from a world class conditioned person in the 30 to 60 seconds that a fight will most likely last.

That is not to say that conditioning is not important at all cause it is important for many other reasons, however when you start talking about a fight where in a matter of a few seconds adrenalin, fear, and energy expended can rapidly deplete your ability to fight...having the skills to actually manage the fight under extreme pressure is much more important.

I personally don't put a high priority on learning to fight like a boxer which is a different management strategy for conditioning and skill.

Your better off gassing yourself out rapidly over and over again doing sprawls and burpees that work the large muscle groups vice spending anytime on punching bag. Your better off spending time in SPEAR suits with someone overwhelming you with punches and kicks while you learn how to manage the fight while trying not to throw up.

If you are going to do conditioning for fights it is all about developing a strong anaerobic capacity. However, even then in real fights it is the guy who gets the jump who usually wins or the guy whose buddy shows up next that determines the winner.

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