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Old 12-02-2012, 06:24 PM   #19
Krystal Locke
Location: Phoenix, Oregon
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 370
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Re: For those who wonder how to use aikido against fast punching

Quote:
Alberto Italiano wrote: View Post
All the points you make here are valid I have read them all but I don't find convenient to place lots of quotes to signify my general agreement with all you all say
You all make sense to me

However I have seen a dozen Aikido dojos in my life and my concern is that too many are not very ralistic when facing a fistfigh scenario most of them actually don't seem to understand what it could be about

I totally agree that in a street fight you can find more than that but I think we all concur that a fist fight is something that does not appear unlikely an event in street or"bar" scenarios so i am addressing that

Since I totally understand that one may have not the opportunity (or the interest) of sparring yet I felt many a time concerned about how aikidokas seem unaware generally speaking of the type of demands that a fist fight may unexpectedly impose upon them

So I am trying to propose for those interested a way to compensate this at least a bit
You can

It is true that a fist fight may be stopped soon but I have seen at least twice a serious fistfight in a pub in my life and there was no security and people running away and the guys in one case went on for minutes with devastating effects on their faces

So also if you cannot spar you may want to be aware of what you need
#1 breath
#2 a kind of breath that is not that of jogging but that of jumping skipping yanking pushing running bouncing back skip evade and a lot of things that will place a much higer and unexpected demand on your physiology
#3 some reflexes that do not need to be terrific but that you can improve significantly

So for those interested in setting up a better condition for a fist fight and to be able to make their way through a puncher so to get one of his arms and apply an aikido technique you may want to consider including a workout like the following for explanation purposes

Hitting is done uniquely to make the ball bounce so forget how one hits that's not the point of concern

If you never did and say you jog 2 or 3 times a week you would be startled how easily you may run out of breath in a couple of minutes of that
I don't want that to happen to you if you meet a thug that does some sparring and decides to show off his "techinique" with you in a bar

Build some breath and a bit of reflexes learn how to move unceasingly around and you will stand a better chance of placing your aikido
As you may see it is not too intensive a workout but will place you in a much better condition for a fist fighter

I am just hoping I can save some bad surprise to aikidokas who may think that trying an iriminage on a puncher may suffice you may discover that you need to do more than that to EARN your technique and that's my point and concern for those who may be interested

You will need to work around the guy a bit
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MpyE6ssxZNk
Gotta say, that's a remarkably slow headache bag. Put a lower connection on it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UnRfr0XH5GY Much better bag, but they are still not working it well. The bungies are way too loose. This is way better: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jxqBuZClrTU

But I have a weird aikido dojo. We have a couple heavy bags, a headache bag, and I might just dig out my speed bag and put it back up. We NEVER use them in class, I'd hate to waste sensei's time on them, but they are there to use. We've got a lot of pretty high ranked folks who never touch the stuff, but can easily handle a puncher. Usually by maintaining ma-ai until they get an overextended punch they can ride back in or exploit with a technique, we've got a good counterpuncher who is a fine teacher. None of this stuff is specifically taught, but it is all clearly included in our aikido. Our sensei isn't Japanese and is a clear and explicit instructor but we are still expected to steal technique, think about how to apply what we're taught, and figure it out on our own. It is hidden in plain sight, I think that's how the saying goes....
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