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Old 11-16-2012, 02:40 PM   #15
vieq
Location: El Mansoura
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 24
Egypt
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Re: about training capacity

Quote:
Janet Rosen wrote: View Post
AH! Resisting against the wrong move WILL create injury.
The way to avoid injury is to relax and move INTO the "wrong move" until you can escape or take a fall/roll.
Also you can INSIST the younger students SLOW DOWN so that if they "crank" hard on your joints you have time to tap out.
God know's how many times I screamed about it, the harm was already done.

Quote:
Charles David Henderson wrote: View Post
Mohamed,

For what it may be worth:

Sometime newer students apply "power" to techniques at places that don't make much sense, but increase the chance of injury. "Cranking" an arm lock, for example, after you've already cooperated in allowing them to apply the technique and entrusted them with your limb. Or trying to complete a throw in an unexpected direction or dangerous position (like shiho nage that requires a break fall).

Over time, it becomes easier to anticipate this kind of problem and to deal with it.

But since you also are a newer student, and since this situation is resulting in injury that limits your training capacity, maybe you should consider taking steps to tone things down for the time being.
This is exactly why I posted, I want to know which steps to take to minimize the injuries as much as I can

Quote:
Charles David Henderson wrote:
You might want to train off the mat, but you may want to focus a lot on the kinds of exercises you do in class. If you have access to some kind of suitable surface, you might also consider practicing your falls.
I can fall, I just do not know how to mimic a wrongful throw fall

Quote:
Charles David Henderson wrote:
I know an instructor who is a very tall and strong guy. He never relies on his strength. He moves in a very precise and graceful way as nage (tori) and has superb ukemi. The kind of weakness I think Phi was getting at doesn't require you to waste away, but to give up relying on being physically strong when you are practicing. When I practice with a child, for example, it is a great opportunity for me to be as soft -- and precise -- as I can.

Good luck.
No No, Sir I was not going to relay on power replacing a wrong move to give it an authentic look; I was counting on escaping from a wrong move using it.

Quote:
Basia Halliop wrote: View Post
FWIW, I do know people who do both strength training and aikido and are not stiff at all. I do a little bit myself and found it helped me get less injuries, not more. I think in theory it's possible to do in such a way that it helps rather than hurting. But it's true that you have to THINK differently in aikido, and get away from the habit of tensing your muscles in certain ways. It's the mind part that's the most different, I think. And you have to be sure to train in such a way that keeps you flexible.

What I've been told by others and try to do myself when doing any kind of strength training is to focus on exercises that go through a full range of motion of my joints, ones that use my whole body including all the little supporting muscles, exercises that work on balance and proprioception and core... Things that help you be strong in a flexible and agile way, not in a stiff or resistant way.

I am not particularly big myself (by which I mean I'm 5'3" and a woman) and I am usually fine with people much bigger than me throwing me around fairly hard or pinning me. The biggest thing is moving with it, not against it, and being relaxed enough that you can feel things quickly to do that. That usually kind of neutralizes the forces. But it's also true that there are times people have you trapped and can hurt you. So communication with your partner is also part of it. Learning when to tap and when to stop your partner and tell them to slow down.
Exercises that go over joints is a good place to start, only if we agreed it will make my joints capable of taking more of this nastiness.

===========================

Guys, I do not want this too look like an argument

I answered the question of me resisting or copping with it.

Power to me means "The Power to Escape" not to "The Power to turn it over"

that's all

Last edited by vieq : 11-16-2012 at 02:42 PM.
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