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Old 11-13-2012, 04:14 AM   #7
Lyle Laizure
 
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Dojo: Hinode Dojo LLC
Location: Omaha, Nebraska
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 560
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Re: Some partners talk too much and even want to do the technique for me!

Quote:
George Donnelly wrote: View Post
Hi

When training, I find that some partners, especially from other dojos (we're doing a seminar now) tend to talk a lot. Do this, do that, watch this, don't forget that.

Sometimes, as uke, they even try to move my body so that the technique is done correctly. IOW, I'm tori and yet they are moving my body for me, from their hold.

I'm sure it's well-intentioned but it gets distracting and frustrating. I feel like I need to have at least some space in which to find my own way. If uke is doing the technique for me, what am I learning, after all?

Not even the 7th dan I have trained with has done that. The lower dans will occasionally do it in minor ways but only after giving me lots of chances.

I'm mu kyu, been training a year. Anyone have any reactions to this? Thanks.
This isn't uncommon in regular dojo practice. I agree that most that do this are well intentioned and truly want you to succeed but in reality they, IMO, diminishing your ability to learn. Making mistakes is part of the process. It is something that you can bring up to your Sensei but if it is during a seminar I would suck it up as to not cause a scene and try to find a partner or two that at least do it less than others.

I kid you not, during one training session there was a new young lady in practice. (So I think that the fact that she was a young lady sparked the situation though I have seen it happen with male students too. But it is unfair to place blame on the lady when it was the, IMO, the inappropriateness of the male instructors that jjust wanted to impress her.) I was the instructor at that moment. I demonstrated the technique and everyone got a partner to practice. The young lady was having difficulty so one of the other instructors went over to assist. As soon as that instructor turned his back to walk away another instructor walked up and proceeded to assist as well. And then again as soon as that one walked away another stepped up. This is too much instruction! Too much information, too much fine detail. Not only was she being given too much information to process she was being robbed of her opportunity to train altogether.

Lyle Laizure
www.hinodedojo.com
Deru kugi wa uta reru
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