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Old 04-03-2012, 05:43 PM   #143
Carl Thompson
 
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Re: The Founder's Teaching Ability

Quote:
Christopher Li wrote: View Post
If you look back at the beginning of the long thread that you have entered at the end (and six months after it started), you will see that it is all about the teaching ability of Ueshiba, and whether he was actually able to transmit his skills consistently (or at all, really).


If he were able to do that then there should have been multiple students after him that reached or exceeded his level. They, in turn, would have students that met or exceeded them, and so on.
Hello Chris

Did Osensei's teacher (Takeda) produce multiple students after him who reached or exceeded his level? Did their students in turn produce students who reached or exceeded Takeda's level? How about the likes of Hisa, who started Daito-ryu under Ueshiba then went on to study it under Takeda, got promoted then later taught it as aikido saying it was the same thing? Did both award him ranks for abilities he had not attained?
Quote:
Christopher Li wrote: View Post
I said that I saw a great many of Ueshiba's senior students, and their students in Japan, and that was not, IMO, the case.
Many of us have become familiar with the acronym IHTBF. Did you feel a great many of Ueshiba's senior students? It is conceivable that Takeda and Ueshiba gave out recognition of ability in the form or ranks or scrolls without regard for the reality. However, if we assume that they did care a little about how people who would represent them would be able to perform, I have the following question for you: How can you tell that these students didn't get the goods when Ueshiba apparently thought they had? In other words, what can you recognise the absence of in his students that Ueshiba could not? CMA skills? Kokyu-ryoku?

Quote:
Carl Thompson wrote: View Post
Quote:
Carl Thompson wrote: View Post
Was he a "great teacher" (an "Osensei") only because he provided the subject to be taught? In other words, I'm asking if he didn't understand basic teaching methods or was too crazy to stick to them. Or did he actually have some degree of pedagogical skill? In the latter case, did he deliberately choose not to use it in order to keep the goods to himself?
What do people think? Better still, can you back it up?

Carl
There seems to be a consensus that Osensei had certain goods himself. I appreciate the study people are doing into how similar skills are found elsewhere but if you find him consistently recognising people for their aikido ability without passing on a particular essential training method there could be a number of reasons. One is that his training method was different. Another is that it was the same as these other arts and he was not competent at passing it on (which begs the question, who was competent?). The ideas that he didn't care or was too lost in his religious pursuits have also been mentioned.

Regards,

Carl

Last edited by Carl Thompson : 04-03-2012 at 05:44 PM. Reason: Text format
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