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Old 09-26-2011, 12:49 PM   #17
lbb
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Re: Discussion of Spirituality from an Aikido Perspective.

Quote:
Keith Gates wrote: View Post
Hi Mary,
Thanks for your input. I was careful to set some sort of definition as to what spirituality was so we need not go down a semantic path.
I accepted your definition. I thought I made that abundantly clear. What I said was NOT "going down a semantic path".

Quote:
Keith Gates wrote: View Post
In terms of Martial Arts as Buddihist Practice I would refer you to 2010 August edition of: The Middle Way, Journal of The Buddhist Society, August 2010 Vol 85. Article entitled "Martial Arts as Buddhist Practice" by Benjamin Charlton.
That article is not available on their website, so since it's germane here, perhaps you could give us the gist of it?

Quote:
Keith Gates wrote: View Post
What I mean when I say 'being grounded' does not mean 'seeking ground' as you seem to have defined it. Perhaps I should clarify. We could argue here about interpretations of the Dharma and the meaning of Anitya, but lets not. I am looking for common ground not a debate over doctrine, although some other time I'd love to. Comparative religion is a favourite topic of mine !
I wasn't debating. What I said was meant to reflect what I think most people mean when they talk about "being grounded" -- not what YOU mean by it.

Quote:
Keith Gates wrote: View Post
Many believe Aiki-do can serve as a valid and effective tool to understand ones own inner (true / original) nature more deeply. That is a little simplistic but by the contemporary definitions given above it qualifies.
Well, yes, but this brings up another issue: that of getting what you asked for, but that it's very different than you thought it would be. Pema Chodron talked one time about how a lot of people come to meditation because they imagine that it will make their minds become like a tranquil pool...and that does happen...but that's when you get to see all the old tires and refrigerators and skeletons lying at the bottom of the pool. Getting to understand your own inner/true/original nature is the same: you get a good look at who you really are...and (at least initially) that's a pretty uncomfortable experience. it's not at all what most people imagine when they talk about getting to know themselves.

Quote:
Keith Gates wrote: View Post
You obviously have some strong feelings on this issue. If I were to ask you what spirituality means to you perhaps we could find some common ground?

Keith
My definition of spirituality isn't the point of disagreement.
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