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Old 05-10-2011, 02:22 AM   #18
Reuben
 
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Dojo: Aikido Seishinkan
Location: Kuching
Join Date: Jan 2002
Posts: 111
Malaysia
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Re: Effective udekimenage against resistance

Quote:
Carsten Möllering wrote: View Post
But what is more interesting to me:
When I practice with people who don't do aikido the ude kime nage which doesn't seem to work is one of the most effective tools. (Without breaking the elbow ... )
Could you share how you do it? Ideally with video if possible (hard to imagine in words)! Much thanks! I would be very grateful for this.

Quote:
Alberto Italiano wrote: View Post
It's a contradiction, yes.
I don't know if Aikido will ever find a way out of this contradiction. I doubt it, because its prerequiste would be having Federations acknowledge the contradiction.
But why should they? Why?

Besides, after all, we can see videos where O'Sensei trains aikidokas exactly in the way most dojos do.

You are alone with this Sphinx, Reuben. You have to find yourself what of Aikido is usable and what not. Nobody's gonna tell you.
Go find a partner off the mat, and check with him - then back to the dojo - then back to check out of the dojo whether what they told you holds "true" against fire.

To date, I have found no better solution - and most of my techniques suck, in fact.
One wonders: do they know that a determined opponent grabbing your arm will NEVER let you place an ikkyo on him?
They make you spin ukes around with iriminage: one wonders, do they know a real attacker will never let you bend his neck with a fairy tales touch?
They make you do ude kime nage against ukes whose consistency is that of leaves in the wind.

Go to the dojo. Then double check outside of it.
Find your Aikido - it won't look beautiful, probably - pretty aikido is for -ahem- demonstration purposes
If you are to be one day good at it, I doubt you will become such going to any Doe Dojo thrice a week. I really doubt it.

Aikido is an art of deception
Well being less than a week away from my 3rd dan exam after practicing tachi dori techniques and san nin holds..you can say that I too have become jaded with the way Aikido is being taught but I refuse to give up just yet.

I am very lucky to have students who don't mind seeing their Sensei get punched in the face when trying out new stuff and those from other disciplines too don't mind showing me their stuff and their opinions of what works and doesn't.

I am also blessed to practice in an MMA studio environment with nice people who aren't out to show how strong they are and are just there to have fun and learn so it's great to try out new stuff on them.

At the end of the day, until someone shows me otherwise, I will continue trying to find modifications of dojo techniques to achieve what I feel are 'Aiki' like solutions to problems as long as they meet the following
a) The ability to control without having to hurt.
b) Using the opponent's energy to off balance him.

Times have changed and so has the nature of attacks. Those who refer to Aikido as being developed from battlefield arts the vast majority I would think know little about fighting on the medieval battlefield (indeed who does nowadays?) and I would hazard a guess that battlefield war then is very much different than your average self defense situation.

The video below of was of me when I was in my first few months training in MMA and was exposed to MMA sparring. I thought it would be fun to just mess about with Aikido to see how it works against someone who does punch combos and is given license to resist if he can. This is an experiment and I realize my uke is much smaller than me and that he's throwing not so committal attacks (which I told him he was free to do so) nor is it a good example of how Aikido (or MMA) should be performed. It is sloppy no less!

I merely thought I record it as a snapshot of my Aikido development and I post it here to share since the discussion has evolved somewhat.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZMg1OuKWcgI

Last edited by Reuben : 05-10-2011 at 02:31 AM.
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