Thread: Ichi no ken ?
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Old 12-12-2010, 05:13 PM   #71
ravenest
Dojo: Way of Falling Water
Location: NSW
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 65
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Thumbs up Re: Ichi no ken ?

Quote:
Deborah Fisher wrote: View Post
Hi Michael, glad we are talking about the same thing! Again, my knowledge is limited, but this is such an exciting part of my practice right now that it's great to discuss it with someone.
Hi Deborah, ditto (finally the discussion is about the thread title )

Quote:
Deborah Fisher wrote: View Post
Yes, to me this is an interesting paradox about what Sugano Sensei was doing. On one hand, everything's about speed, and not about form. There are only two strikes. Each strike is to be completed quickly. I took a small handful of Sugano's weapons classes before he stopped teaching due to illness, and I could never come close to keep up with his expectations re: speed, and assumed that this was the only goal. But this system is really more about (to my eye anyway) developing a sense of connection with your partner.
I havent done this exercise looking at speed, all instructors have focused on different aspects; relationship, music and rythym (the first time I ever understood what the hell Mushashi was talking about when he goes; 'Dont go; ho-hum ho-ha hum, go; ha-ho, ha ho, HUM (or something like that?) There seem to be a LOT of levels of learning in this. I've encountered the mad speed thing with students ... but maybe thats not what you mean?
Quote:
Deborah Fisher wrote: View Post
Stopping as "teacher" to check your "student's" accuracy is an interesting doorway to understanding a lot of things about reaction and timing. So on one hand, you have this system based on two cuts and this notion that a sword is a smashing tool, not so much a delicate slicing tool.
Hmmm ... I've encountered that with students too, but I dont get that from this exercise. I learnt a totally differnt way of attacking with the sword from these exercises compared to sword work I did in another school, they used it like an axe! In my understanding the the two strikes are KIRITSUKI (there ya go Josh ) I see this as a thrusting cut to the forhead. The way I was taught is that the sword comes down, when hands are at eye level the sword more or less maintains its position and the body 'surges' forward 'following' the sword ... sorta. In Kyu-shin-ryu they charge forward and crash the sword down on top of the head. This leaves the attacker very open to a thrusting off line attack. When I tried this against kiritsuki the oncoming blade deflected my thrust, ran up my blade and straight in to the top of the forehead. I see the other type of attack as a type of di-jodan (?) , by that I mean, a cut straight down on to the top of the head ... a bit like an axe blow ... I see its use more as a follow up technique for close quarters, where one doesnt have space to lead with the sword. I'd say the knee attack in 3 seems to be a slice?
Quote:
Deborah Fisher wrote: View Post
And on the other you wind up with these very intense moments of connection--the sensations of drawing and forcing, or understanding that if your hanmi is rigid you give your partner too much information
Yes ... I've deffinatly changed that! Look at some clips of sowrd that have been linked here and other places ... not much classic hanmi there.
Quote:
Deborah Fisher wrote: View Post
--that are much harder to get in an empty hand practice. For me, anyway. It's much easier for me to learn how to keep my sword "empty" than it is for me to keep my arm "empty."

Regarding footwork and getting where you need to be in time, the emphasis I am being taught is on sliding and shuffling, and staying in right hanmi and keeping your feet close together. If you're in a relatively tight hanmi, you can spring back or forth, but if you plant yourself, you're done.
So glad to hear that, I got sick of being told (in the other school) not to do little springs or jumps ... but they worked! - when nothing else seemed to.
Quote:
Deborah Fisher wrote: View Post
The thing I've been finding most interesting these days is where to focus my eyes. In that video Sugano says that thing about not looking at the weapon, not looking at the opponent, and talks about how hard that is. No kidding!! I find that if I kind of try to focus on the wall behind my partner, my reaction times are better. But that if I am looking at my partner directly, I get really jumpy and anticipatory. Interesting.
No ... LOOK at you partner ... ALL of him (or her), not just a bit of them. Look at them like you look at a distant mountain or a tree. You see the tree as a whole, not looking at all the seperate leaves branches twigs and trunk, take the whole lot in in one go. Its a type of spherical awareness and should extend in a sphere around you (you will pick it up from Ju-waza - unless your teacher instructs people not to attack if you arent looking at them ????? ) or years as a (surviving) motorcycle rider. Look at all of them but dont be attached to them. Throw a handfull of something on a table or the ground and count the objects all at once without individual counting ... that sorta stuff. I guess one is also looking at other things with this 'holistic' vision ,,, the persons 'demenour', spirit, ki 'stream', etc?
Quote:
Deborah Fisher wrote: View Post
When it works, it's amazing. And thinking about how it works is really thrilling. I can't say I understand it but today is weapons class and I am really looking forward to spending some time with this.
Lucky you! I damaged my back at training last week AGAIN! No training for me - bummer. In so much pain I thought ... okay, I gotta give this up. Today I can walk again and I'm thinking ... hmmm wonder how long before .... ? But G. F. has given me a little lecture about it and responsibility . (Note; JIC - I have serious back issues and dont blame the actuall aikido, its good for it! I flu through the air, wrestle and roll, then walk a cross the mat, turn and step funny . wack! out it goes _ I can lift up the back of the car but last time I injured it it was lifting a 2kg, water bottle? - So - if you are new and reading this - thats why I get injured ... actually Nikyo seems to be the only thing that fixes my shoulder!)

Quote:
Deborah Fisher wrote: View Post
Yes, that's my understanding as well. Blocking is stupid, it ruins your sword. It's for training purposes only. But it's hard to return that first strike with any accuracy at all without some practice just getting your boken up there, IMO.

Yes, this is #3, and this is as far as I've gone. It's a knuckle scraper! I can't talk about it, I've only done it a handful of times.
Three seems to have this nice fluidity to it, the way the sword is returned to its 'up' position after the knee deflection (when the wrist is 'offered' )seems crucial to create this 'wave' - 'sucked into the attack' effect I was talking about above

No 4 awaits you - easy ... just remember all the rest but do it on the other side .... HA ... a real brain twister! (for some)

Last edited by ravenest : 12-12-2010 at 05:20 PM.
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