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Old 04-26-2010, 09:43 AM   #14
Erick Mead
 
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Dojo: Big Green Drum (W. Florida Aikikai)
Location: West Florida
Join Date: Jun 2005
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Re: Control in the martial arts.

Quote:
Jon Reading wrote: View Post
How does a combat art preserve its viability without actual combat? The general observation is that without the experience of fighting, combat training becomes a contrivance of simulated scenarios. After a period of times, the art loses the meaning for the contrived scenarios and we are left with choreography.

As this observation relates to striking, I believe those arts that have contact striking will hold advantage over those arts which choose to eliminate contact striking in the realm of "viable" fighting arts.
The only quibble is that striking arts tend to seek strikes to the exclusion of what opportunities are presented in actual advantages. Counting coups is just as easy a trap, too. Takemusu (whether of aiki or something else) is the ideal and aiki is a good road to that state. Anticipate nothing, exploit everything...

Quote:
Jon Reading wrote: View Post
Aikido curriculum for most does not include matched fighting, contact striking, or even opposed resistance. As such, that puts aikido at a disadvantage in fighting scenarios where the focus of the engagement is not on "do" (the pursuit of self-improvement). The argument posed by many in aikido is sacrificial to the other arts, "we do not need to be actual fighters; aikido is about self-improvement."
Which is, I think we agree, a position of BS on stilts.

When human beings ceased to be predatory animals then self-improvement will not involve making us better at doing violence -- until then it does. A woman writing in the journal First Things made this point about the development of young men. --
Quote:
"The desire to commit violence is not the same thing as the desire to commit evil."
We would all be better human beings to remember both sides of her point.

Quote:
The problem is not that the boy's hand itches for a sword. The problem lies in not telling him what they are for, that they are for something—the sword and the itch alike. If I had told my aggressive little son not, "Be gentle," but, rather, "Protect your sister," I might, I think, have had the right end of the stick.
Quote:
Jon Reading wrote: View Post
For aikido training, the role of atemi is fundamental to controlling the human condition during engagement. We should advocate [at minimum] competency in striking in our curriculum, regardless of what rules we enact for safety.
I make it a point when folks come into our dojo to see to it that they hit me, competently -- hard enough that I am uncomfortable -- then 1) I know they can strike honestly and correctly, and 2) they know that even the instructor is prepared to bear getting hit -- if things work out that way. I figure if my ego is so big it iust keeps getting hit all the time -- my body will understand the need to make it much smaller...

Quote:
Jon Reading wrote: View Post
If I punch falsely and do not modify my partner's behavior, I am not in control.
Amen and Hallelujah.

Last edited by Erick Mead : 04-26-2010 at 09:51 AM.

Cordially,

Erick Mead
一隻狗可久里馬房但他也不是馬的.
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