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Old 04-09-2010, 11:18 PM   #106
Mike Sigman
Location: Durango, CO
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 4,123
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Re: Video definitions, "Aiki" and other terms.

Quote:
Robert M Watson Jr wrote: View Post
Not quite. For example cut one rubber band and watch what happens to the tensegrity structure ... if ones arm is severed do the legs fall off? Not quite.

Also, note that the paper referenced speaks to signaling pathways (still not solidly established) and nothing about load bearing. Granted fascia does bear loads (like holding ones organs in place, etc) but in primarily static modes. I would be more open to entertain ideas about how fluids acting incompressibly transmit force but it leaves one to wonder what is the 'pipe' and take note of the required properties of said 'pipe' when under pressure.

Not to derail the thread but if fascia is held up as a component of aiki it requires much firmer evidence.

Perhaps we should delay the 'how' of aiki until the 'what' of aiki is settled a bit more -particularly if one wishes the list the functions of fascia amongst the hows.
One of the things I've watched for many years is how the legends and theories have grown unchecked. The whole "fascia" thing has developed a life of its own, once the term "fascia" made its way into the jargon back in the mid-1990's (and yeah, I've listened to various people swear that they came into it based on their own brilliant understanding). My suggestion is that people stop theorizing about how "fascia" plays a role in these things until they get a better idea. These posts are archived, after all.

The schematics and freeze-dried photos of fascia have absolutely nothing to do with the conversation. Fascia having its own motile functions has very little to do with it, also. Instead of theorizing because there's a keyboard handy, maybe it's better to spend some time finding info and practicing.

Cutting to the chase... most of the fascia discussions are simply off-center, as Rob is gently trying to point out.

FWIW

Mike Sigman