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Old 02-24-2010, 02:07 PM   #18
Thomas Campbell
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 407
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Re: YouTube: Li Chugong teaching taiji usage

Quote:
Allan Featherstone wrote: View Post
That would be cool to see Tom.
Allan, I haven't been able to find a clear video example of Sam Chin describing and then demonstrating tun/tou the way he did at the Portland seminar. There may be something close on one of Sam's many DVDs, but I left all of mine with a Portland guy to encourage him in his training.

Sam often uses his own ILC terminology to explain a martial principle in action.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gHuDb9Ou3Kk

Note this is not what Sam referred to as "swallow and spit" at the seminar, but is just an illustration of how Sam explains a principle of application. This is an example of a principle applied to the training partner or opponent, i.e., what is happening to the other person.

Sam will complement that with an explanation of what is happening in his own body (the example here is in another context, producing a wave by absorbing and projecting):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y8doU3yMheU

"Float, Sink, Swallow, Spit" is often referred to in southern CMAs, like in these Bak Mei drills

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X-kbWU7H0vs

and in Lung Ying (the art of the older man in the clip)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w-tRnNOhPRE

While southern CMAs seem to have influenced the Chin family art, what Sam demonstrated in Portland was more subtle, powerful, and swifter at touch than the two examples shown above.

Regardless, in demonstration the four are sometimes shown as aspects of the same circle: Swallow = deflecting and adhering, sinking = grounding of the force, taking and moving under the opponent's center, floating = beginning to return the energy, extending into the opponent (the effect can make the opponent feel like they are literally floating), and spit = short pulsing of force (strike). In a very basic sense, swallow and sink might correspond to the "absorbing" concept of Sam's ILC, and float and spit to the "projecting" phase (my very limited and possibly inaccurate understanding of what Sam showed). So much for words . . . hands-on is definitely the way to learn and understand.

It is cool to see subtle and effective demonstrations of jin in other martial arts like Li Chugong demonstrates with his Chen taijiquan--an art that often seems afflicted with belching jin.
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