View Single Post
Old 12-21-2009, 04:33 PM   #38
MM
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 1,996
United_States
Offline
Re: Some similarities in Internal Body Skills between Chinese and Japanese arts

Quote:
Mike Sigman wrote: View Post
I asked you *what* was valuable, Mark. Think of it from my point of view.... if you find all that stuff that's being posted in the RSF thread "valuable", but I don't, then your view of valuable is different from mine, in that regard. So my question is why I should say anything when you're apparently confused about what is valuable and what is not.... see my point?

That's why if you want someone to offer some pointers, you need to step up and write some how-to's and show that you're thinking and not just waiting for a handout.

Incidentally, most of that stuff on RSF is guys impressing each other with buzzwords; it's not useful "how-to" information. Go through each post and read it carefully for any "how-to" information while comparing what is said in terms of buzzwords, veiled hints of secret knowledge, and so forth. You'll see what I mean.

FWIW

Mike Sigman
Well, let me take portions and give you the opportunity to show where it misses the mark or you don't find it valuable and why.

Quote:
Dan Harden wrote:
I would tend to agree about the knee winding translation. but he might be showing some deeper things (I don't know Chinese).
Twining the knees is indicative of the hips being tied to them, (this is how most people move, and it is more pronounced in western fighters)all in all it's something which I would avoid. Coiling or winding is an accurate statement but mores the point is what is coiling from where. I think it's very important to understand that the legs are coiling and the feet are stable and grab the earth. The feet rock most often because the knees pull them out of line. and its the hips that pull the kness out of line. The bones of the legs need to remain stable and the muscles are pulled coiling up and opening on one side and coiling and winding down on the other. But the bones stay straight and therefore the feet are stable. If anything the knees may go back and forth (like in and out from front to back) but never are they pulled with the coiling as to sway side to side with the hips. Twining the knees weakens the peng and in training it also can hurt the knees over time. Proper coiling makes VERY strong and stable knees that function independant from the hips. they are held stable by opposing spirals from the feet up through the kua drawn by the dantian, turned by the waist and supported be the lower back (with the psoas). Trainng this way stabilizies the entire chain, so walking and being "rocked" by uneven terrain (like he comically tries to demonstrate at the end when he is mimicing a stumble) is less likely.
That pretty much goes into some detail on spirals and windings through the legs and to watch for the knees in particular. Granted, it doesn't give a specific "how-to" but then again, most would agree IHTBF to be trained.

If you disagree, where would that be? Why? I can't see it to be the spiral portion because here, you state:

Quote:
Mike Sigman wrote: View Post
The process of "The Cross" (which is very limited and comes from Southern Shaolin) began to develop into "spiralling" and a host of other things, just as I predicted things *must* go, some years back.

FWIW

Mike Sigman
I took that to mean you know about spiraling. So, I'm confused as to where you think things miss the mark.

Quote:
Mike Sigman wrote: View Post
And then this "greatness" began to intrude and other people, including Ueshiba, became "amateurs".
FWIW

Mike Sigman
Even you have trivialized Ueshiba's knowledge and skills, Mike. And you've readjusted your views of what he knew over the years.

Quote:
Mike Sigman wrote: View Post
And a last thing to think of: It's unclear how much of the complete hara/dantien usage that Ueshiba had. My opinion of what he knew has grown over the last 4-5 years.

Best.

Mike
Quote:
Mike Sigman wrote: View Post
Watching the pattern of my speculations/observations about Aikido and I.S. over the years, the trend is that I have to amend to allow that Ueshiba, Tohei, and a few others new more than I originally estimated, but less that "full banana" level of some of the so-called "internal martial arts". Aikido, as done by Ueshiba, appears to be an art that uses "neijin" (internal strength) and "neigongs" (internal exercises via misogi, breathing techniques, etc.), but it is not one of the "neijia" (internal family of martial arts) because it doesn't have the full-blown Six Harmonies movement.... but there are caveats too complicated to go into on this forum.
FWIW

Mike Sigman
  Reply With Quote