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Old 08-04-2009, 08:57 PM   #26
Kevin Leavitt
 
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Dojo: Aikido of Northern Virginia
Location: Stuttgart, Baden Wurttemberg
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 4,369
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Re: the changed body

Josh wrote:

Quote:
But i also know that truth is messier or more complex. I wonder, for instance if there is any negative or down side to the work? We've, for instance, all seen Schwarzenegger's deflated muscle-body now that he is older... I wonder what happens if you stop the kind of work that gives you
Schwarzenegger changed his body into something that was not natural at all. He used steriods and some very extreme training measures to take his body beyond the limits of what was intended in nature. In away I would categorize that as abuse to be honest.

I don't pay alot of attention to him, but he does seem to still be in pretty damn good shape though for his age and I am sure it is due to the fact that he still works out, eats right...and you bet that he is still disciplined enough to do the right things to keep himself fit at his age.

What he shows is that the body is pretty resilient and forgiving really.

Personally i feel there is a difference in these training methods. You are not abusing the body, but working with it gently and encouraging it to become strong and move in ways that are within the context of natural parameters. You are simply fine tuning it to a level that is way above the average person.

Mike Sigman did caution about trying to train too hard, straining too much, or holding your breath and things like that as it will cause you problems...things like High Blood Presssure, Strokes, aneurisms. So yes, I think you can overtrain with this as well, but it will not help.

So, if you stop training, I don't see how you would realize any bad effects from training, except that your body would probably return to a state of atrophy equal to the level of what you are not doing.

Actually I feel pretty good when I do train, so not sure why you would want to stop once it starts to become a habit. The hard part is starting and developing the habits. Also hard is you need to get with someone regularly to work with that can provide you feedback and guidance I think.

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