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Old 07-13-2009, 07:34 AM   #70
JimCooper
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 66
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Re: The Challenge of Not Competing

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Mark Murray wrote: View Post
Perhaps, I didn't explain that enough.
You did, I just have a different opinion. I really do mean they attempted to build his character, and not just so he would follow orders. Mind you, this was officer training in a very small Navy, so it was probably different to your experience.

Quote:
Mark Murray wrote: View Post
Well, from the overall picture of sports to the detailed distinct reason of sports, it's different than martial arts.
Well, yes and no. Some MAs have drifted into being sports, really. And of course there is a difference between a MA and a sport, but that's to miss the point.

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Mark Murray wrote: View Post
Overall picture of sports includes being a part of a team that competes in front of an audience.
Well, sometimes. There are non-team sports, and I very rarely had an audience when I played sport :-) I'm **not** talking mainly about professional sport, but that which nearly 100% of people playing sport play. (Although I have met a few top class sportspeople - representatives of their countries - and they have been the nicest people, very positive, always seeing problems as challenges to be overcome)

Of course there will always be overly-competitive people who are a PITA, both in sport and in a dojo.

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Mark Murray wrote: View Post
And that's not always a good thing:
Ditto for martial arts. This is why people used to be screened before they were taught. You can learn a MA purely to be a more effective thug.

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Mark Murray wrote: View Post
When is the last time that you saw an aikido training session break out in riots?
I've never played in any game that broke out in riots.

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Mark Murray wrote: View Post
How about why you're actually playing that sport? What's the end goal? Isn't there always some trophy or award? There are always winners and losers. Someone always defeats someone else.
Well, no. There are draws and ties as well (they're actually different things in cricket).

I think this is the crux of the problem. If you were taught to play sport purely in order to win, then you were taught badly, and you've missed out on a great deal.

The point of sport is to **strive** to win.

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Mark Murray wrote: View Post
And how many sport fights have their been by team players?
How many wars have been fought by martial artists?

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Mark Murray wrote: View Post
There is no life and death in sport.
I'm not so sure. Some sports are terrifyingly dangerous. And how much "life and death" is there in a modern dojo?

Like I said, it seems I was taught sport differently than you, and it *should* have many more benefits than you think. I'm sorry that has not been your experience
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