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Old 10-18-2008, 12:26 AM   #33
Joe McParland
 
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Dojo: Sword Mountain Aikido & Zen
Location: Baltimore, MD
Join Date: Jul 2007
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Re: Acceptable Aikido Vices?

Quote:
Alex Lawrence wrote: View Post
Hmmmm.

That's not quite what I had in mind. I was thinking more pragmatically. Yes there have always been romantic tales of the martial arts but at their heart was a central truth: An art that doesn't psychologically prepare you to put your physical skills into action isn't worth the paper it's densho are written on.

At the risk of sounding like a samurai wannabe, a bit in bushido shoshinshu kinda relates to this when the author states that you can tell brave people even in peace time by their personal habbits.

If someone for example can't even handle their drinking or their gambling, or whatever "vice" you care to mention, can you expect them to be particularly reliable in a life and death situation?
An issue like that indicates some deep personality flaw and thus an opening.

So if you think about it closing up those openings is as vital, as closing up your physical openings.
When you hold such a pragmatic view of what aikido is to you, you naturally judge everyone around you according to that standard.

So, here's a question: During your actual practice---particularly during the more intense or exhausting moments---are you actively holding that view and judging others accordingly?

Outside of the dojo, sitting in easy chairs, you and I may have some intellectual disagreement about what the practice is for, and our minds may never meet on these issues---we are not in harmony. On the mats, though, if I strike at you with all of my being and you throw me with all of yours, then in that moment our minds do match---they are equally empty, and we are in harmony.

So it's true: my talking about my own opinion of aikido is not different than you talking about yours. Our thoughts about aikido are equally pointless. On the mats, though, we may both have it

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