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Old 10-13-2008, 03:22 AM   #28
Ed Stansfield
 
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Dojo: Mason Street Dojo
Location: Manchester
Join Date: Jul 2004
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Re: Koshi Nage

Hello,

I don't practice a lot of koshinage, so my words can be safely ignored.

That said...

Quote:
Alex Lawrence wrote:
That there are many ways of doing koshi nage, but as long as certain fundamentals are kept then the technique is recognisable as koshi nage.
I also agree. For example:

The distance between his feet varies, but see 1.03, 1.24, 1.31, 1.58.

Or look at the picture on page 24-25 of "Aikido and the Harmony of Nature" (the drawing by Mitsugi Saotome and then the photo of Hiroshi Ikeda).

Quote:
David Soroko wrote:
Saito demonstrates, why is important to be able to turn towards your blind spot once the throw is completed. This approach allows for multiple attackers and indicates true Aikido quality.
Quote:
Alejandro Villanueva (in reply to Alex Lawrence) wrote:
Yes, but here we're talking about Aikido's Koshi Nage in contrast to other arts' Koshi Nage(s). And one fundamental to keep is "watch your back; that foe has friends!".
I agree that the idea that "there are many enemies" is important. However, it is too much of a jump for me to say that this is the determining factor of whether something is, or isn't koshinage (or indeed, Aikido, as the arguments above appear to run). If it was, then wouldn't we be led to the conclusion that Ikkyo isn't an Aikido technique?

Or going back to the Tissier example above, would it really be said that sometimes he's doing koshinage and sometimes he isn't? How close do his feet have to be before it's not koshinage?

For me, a better way to determine would start from the question "Does this technique embody the principles of Aiki?"; I cannot see why you cannot employ and embody those principles while creating a koshinage with your feet close together. If you did that, then for me it would be Aikido.

Best,

Ed

It is a good thing for an uneducated man to read books of quotations.

Winston Churchill, 1930.
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