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Old 08-28-2008, 12:33 PM   #27
DH
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 3,394
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Re: Transmission, Inheritance, Emulation 9

Hi George
The other very possible explanations for the exit was that the syllabus was vast and some folks got what they wanted or needed and split-no anger, just grattitude.
It's interesting to view entries in his Mokuroku from as far back as 1898 and see yanagi ryu, Yagyu shinen, Yagyu shingen (teachers and students) Soke's of Koryu, Judoka from 1900!, Itto ryu, on and on. So many Koryu, its staggering.
To get into detail will cause dissention, suffice to say there is a body method. Some might have felt once they got that-or thought they got it to whatever degree- they found the pretzel logic jujutsu superflouos.
This is what I mean by subjective viewpoints. The above was my own very personal journey. I could have put up with the personalities -no problem- if I thought there was more I wanted to get. So the teacher /student issue was irrelevent for my case. Therefore making a statement that assigns "exiting" after ten years as doing so -only- due to personalites isn't nearly conclusive. It's just a single aspect of a broader view from a few students perspectives. Others, such as; what you were looking for, what you got, time and distance, lack of funds though you wanted to continue, Takeda traveleing too much, students life choices interfering, etc. deserve just as much merit. Were his students as one-dimensional in their thinking as we could suggest in a post or a book? I hardly think so.

Ueshiba's choices could have encompassed all of the above or a single one. Near as I can tell he never stated why in public. Sokaku, on the other hand left a letter with his feelings addressed.
Stan says Kissomaru had several letters between Ueshiba and Takeda that he would neither discuss nor present. So we are left with speculation based on what little is known.

Last edited by DH : 08-28-2008 at 12:48 PM.
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