View Single Post
Old 07-30-2008, 10:57 PM   #33
David Orange
Dojo: Aozora Dojo
Location: Birmingham, AL
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 1,508
United_States
Offline
Re: Pre War Aikido, 1930 through Iwama period

Quote:
Salim Shaw wrote: View Post
I don't know the full history of sensei Masatomi Ikeda, 7th dan. I do know that he studied Judo prior to Aikido. Interesting enough he teaches his students newaza. I wonder if he understood Aikido from a different perspective (pre war)? Clip below.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=85Jxmles0Hk
No, that's straight judo he's demonstrating and it's a common kind of thing for aikido teachers with judo experience to occasionally throw in some judo for perspective. That material was never part of daito ryu or prewar aikido.

Quote:
Salim Shaw wrote: View Post
Another good sensei, Julio Toribio 5th dan, performing sacrifice throws. Maybe really, the pre war Aikido is more of a persons perspective.
Well, those few things where he goes to the ground are not really what you would call sacrifice throws. They're more like escapes. This clip, featuring one of the pre-war greats of aikido, shows some real sacrifices, starting about 3:00.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sf39s46Qxcg

But these sacrifice techniques are Mochizuki Sensei's own developments and they were not part of daito ryu or Ueshiba's aikido. His "ordinary aikido," shown from about the 2:00 minute mark to about the 3:00 minute mark, is closer to pre-war aikido, but maybe more pragmatic because it excludes all techniques that rely on the attacker's own grip to execute the throws. Mochizuki Sensei did not trust that kind of throw. If you grabbed him, he would cut your grasp off, re-grasp you, then throw you with his grasp--not yours. But even pre-war, Ueshiba's aikido often used the attacker's own grasp to execute the throws. So "pre-war" should not be confused to mean "harsher" or "rougher" aikido and it certainly should not be thought to include sutemi-waza (sacrifices). And it's definitely not a matter of "perspective" unless you mean the perspective of having studied with Morihei Ueshiba before WWII.

David

Last edited by David Orange : 07-30-2008 at 11:01 PM.

"That which has no substance can enter where there is no room."
Lao Tzu

"Eternity forever!"

www.davidorangejr.com
  Reply With Quote