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Old 01-29-2008, 07:38 PM   #97
Chris Parkerson
Dojo: Academy of the Martial Arts
Location: ohio
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 740
United_States
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Re: Is Aikido effective for police?

Dave,

Written words are so limited and so easily taken out of context.
I do not judge those who do not train every day as much as I am challenging myself and others who desire to be better trainers.

Kevin states the objective reality. Most professionals are challenged with many requirements and too little time. Few except the pure enthusiasts will leave family in the evenings for the dojo on a regular basis.

What I suggest is that there are ways (some discovered and some yet undiscovered) that can shorten the learning curve and still improve technique and flow rather than just improving strength, speed and endurance.

For instance, at the ASLET 2002 convention, San Bernadino SO worked out a lecture on "seamless training", the idea of which integrated all elements of an encounter and taught to the gestalt.

They early-on evaluated their body of techniques, determined which ones were fine motor skill and which were gross motor skill. They determined which were similar in form and application in order to avoid clustered training. They determined which ones best interacted with their other tactical options to avoid fragmented training. They originally had from the 1990's evolved to 36 basic techniques. After the process, they had 7. The seven techniques could be used from standing (advantage or disadvantage) or ground (top or bottom).

They also included an "instinctive" strategy call the "in basket" theory. It's thesis is that, under pressure of stress, confusion, and hyper-stimulation, the brain will seek out the "first", not necessarily the "best", solution to the problem. They hoped to blend the "in- basket" to their ideal goal of an outcome by attaching emotional connection to the seven techniques.

These ideas are good ones, yet they still need proving through time. But each of us can continue to grow ideas and test them so that the average cop can have a home life and still produce excellent defensive skills when needed.
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