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Old 06-26-2007, 11:49 AM   #12
George S. Ledyard
 
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Dojo: Aikido Eastside
Location: Bellevue, WA
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 2,624
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Re: Audio Interview with Sensei George Ledyard...

Quote:
Gianluigi Pizzuto wrote: View Post
This is a video of Ikeda Sensei talking about what Ledyard Sensei mentioned in his interview about the movement getting smaller and smaller....
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=INYE8DbeXAQ

Ledyard Sensei, I have a question about this subject. My Sensei, who studied under Saotome Sensei and Ikeda Sensei so you might know him, told me something once. Now, let me put my hands forward (an Italian saying) by saying I am a very beginner and usually beginners tend to accept notion given as absolute truth and that makes so that most of the time most of us tend to reason in 2 dimension. I don't mean we need to doubt what we are told, but we tend to put that piece of notion in a box and treasure it as only truth so that we always miss the surrounding of the box.
Sensei told me that, reasoning with the sphere, the harder the tension Uke puts into his attack the smaller will be the circular movement (or at least that's what I understood). While if the tension is minimal the sphere increase in size and the movement becomes bigger.
My question is: According to what I was told, does that mean that Saotome Sensei and Ikeda Sensei can throw Uke with such a small movement that can't be seen only if Uke creates an incredible strong and resisting attack?

Forgive me if I said a stupid thing....and don't blame my Sensei for my faults hee hee.
When things get compressed, they store energy. Really small technique has a lot of energy. If you are talking about grabbing attacks, it would be true that running a really small spiral movement would require a committed garb on the part of the attacker. Running that much energy through a weak connection would be like trying to run 20,000 volts through a wire designed for 12 volts.

However, if the contact point does involve the opponent's grab, but rather the nage has his hands on uke, then the strength of attack on the part of uke isn't a concern anymore because nage is creating the physical connection through which the energy runs.

George S. Ledyard
Aikido Eastside
Bellevue, WA
Aikido Eastside
AikidoDvds.Com
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