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Old 05-19-2007, 12:01 PM   #17
Qatana
 
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Dojo: Aikido of Petaluma, Petaluma,CA
Join Date: Jan 2003
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Re: Observing a technique

Quote:
Chuck Clark wrote: View Post
It's similar to ballet students learning to watch choreography and be able to model that reasonably well quickly and then become closer with every repitition. It's a process that must be worked on until it becomes a valuable tool for learning.

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Yes and a little no to this. Whe I started ballet I couldn't sight read to save my life. However, every step in ballet has a name and we got those names and steps drilled into us in every class. And at least my teachers, when drilling us, verbalised as well as demonstrated how to do each step. It took me about two years to be able to pick up a combination and perform it immediately afterward,and as Iam an auditory/kinesthetic learner it was much easier when i knoew the names of the steps and didn't even have to see some of the combination to learn it.
It is also a muscle that has to be exercised regularly- I hadn't danced in nearly ten years when I started training and had to learn sight reading all over again.
So I am one of those people who, at seminars, does have trouble duplicating a technique right off the bat, but as soon as I have felt and been told how it is correctly done I can do a reasonable reproduction.
Now I get surprised whe watching a particularly complicated technique and the body just picks it up.

Q
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