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Old 02-27-2002, 07:33 PM   #29
mle
Dojo: The Dojo (www.the-dojo.com
Location: Bavaria
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 78
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Re: inheritors of Aikido?

Quote:
Originally posted by Bruce Baker
Bruce, man, you need to get your money back from that Dale carnegie course ...

We can hash over the many intricaces of history and who did this and who did that, but what I want to know is ... are we getting the same quality training from either family handed down arts, or from those who have trained with inheritors and pass it down?

In some cases, yes. In some, no. It depends on the situation, the people and the system.

That all depends on if you know what you are talking about?

Exactly! I don't think anyone here could argue with THAT statement ...

If you never leave your house, or block, or neighborhood ... how do you know there is a bigger world with other things? Because you see things in a store, doesn't mean you understand what they are or what they do?

Agreed. One of my students is fond of saying "If you don't date anybody but family, pretty soon ya'll all start looking alike ..."

Cross-training is good, knowing your own system's lineage and workings, and theories can only be made stronger by examining those of other ryuha and systems.

On the other hand, some of the greatest teachers took from other arts, and created

I'd say ALL the great teachers did so. The history of budo has always been one of thesis, antihtesis, synthesis.

Get back on track, children.

Bruce, who are you calling children? There are folks on this forum who have 40 or more years of experience in budo, some of whom are recognized leaders in the budo community. Even the hoi polloi like me can range up to nearly 30 years of training under their belts. Others have been training a few years, but are gifted, talented, dedicated budoka.

Calling people children because they don't conform you your apparently very limited vision of what aikido ought to be is condescending, arrogant and darn near spiteful.

You need to focus on the purpose martial arts was created for ... to kill ... and the fact that Aikido was changed to polish the spirit and benefit human beings!

Yes and yes. And your point might be???


In Japanese culture the importance of tracing a lineage, unbroken, back to the kings from the sky is different from the chinese lineage of divine lineage which changes like most cultures with history and progress. Many times, even in aikido, some of the brightest and best teachers are those who question and search for the answers without giving in to those who tell them there are no answers.

OK, I know I'm unenlightened. What the heck are you trying to say there? Traditional Japanese culture traces th elineage of the emperor (and thus the Japanese people and nation itself) to the gods. So do MOST societies, in fact, I can't think of any who do not.

... Its a lot more fun to play with the other children, isn't it?

Now you're just being small again. You won't make any headway that way, not when you're talking to bright, aware, curious, energetic folks like the people here, some of whom have have more years on the mat than you have on this Earth.

Sigh.

Chuck

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