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Old 01-29-2007, 04:14 PM   #277
Erick Mead
 
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Dojo: Big Green Drum (W. Florida Aikikai)
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Re: Baseline skillset

Quote:
Mike Sigman wrote:
As I said, a conversation about reeling silk internal strength is not really germane to Aikido. It's particularly not germane to a thread topic about "Baseline skillset", IMO.
Great! We agree that it is not very germane to basic skills, and then we can ignore the recommendation that you just made that we ought to consider it.

Perhaps you would care to elaborate on a couple of minor points about "silk reeling," and the fundamentals of the fascial "skills" that you posit as basic to aikido (and all martial arts).
Quote:
Mike Sigman wrote:
... there are indeed these skills/body-abilities, so we can still talk about them, whether we're using western terms like "ground path", fascia, etc., or to clarify that we're talking about the skills referred to traditionally, we can sparingly use the terms ki, qi, jin, kokyu, etc.
So, if I get this right, we can knowledgeably and rightfully talk about the ki/kokyu skills, because they can be shown to exist (IF someone knows how to do them), but all the other "things that are Ki", like the "Ki of Heaven", etc., from the old beliefs won't fly as "valid descriptions of Ki".... because they don't exist in reality.
http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showpo...&postcount=144
Quote:
Mike Sigman wrote:
"Silk", as in "Silk Reeling", "Pulling Silk", "Eight Pieces of Silk (brocade)", etc., refer to the fascia/connective-tissue/membranes. You work them with stretches, breathing, twisting (as in 'silk reeling'), but always in a way that does it from head to toe, fingertips and toes included.
http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showpo...2&postcount=25

So, if the fascial "skills" you are talking about are so essential to jin/ kokyu, then I guess we need the most "pure" usages to train baseline skillsets to avoid belaboring my pointless "waza" and "techniques," I suppose. Obviously, that should not include "silk reeling," as you say:
Quote:
Mike Sigman wrote:
... reeling silk winds the body in the way it naturally winds as the force behind its jin; pulling silk is a linear in-out usage of jin. Theoretically, for complex reasons I'd rather not try to write out, reeling silk is the only solution to "pure" usage of the jin, so anyone who uses jin/kokyu who doesn't use winding/spiralling would technically be admitting to a lapse ...
http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showpo...1&postcount=28

And I guess my point about the ultimate evolution of the kokyu connection into into the "twitch" of kokyu tanden ho at contact -- once you "get" the applicaton of kokyu in its proper form -- is just completely off base:
Quote:
Mike Sigman wrote:
Well, let me take out the "forces" part of ki, the "jin/kokyu" things for a second, in order to make things clearer. [It's a justifiable thing to excerpt because you can build up Ki and not have any 'forces' skills, as was demonstrated when Tohei pushed over those monks to prove god-knows-what] If you take that part out, you're left with an ability within the fascia and autonomic muscle functions that is somewhat related to the way a horse can quiver it's flanks, etc. (there's more to it than that, but I'm simply hurrying to make a point so I'm oversimplifying)
http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showpo...&postcount=115
Quote:
Mike Sigman wrote:
Well it's one of those things that in order to understand what's happening, you'd have to already have acquired some jin/kokyu skills and some development of the "ki" structure in the sense of the fascia.
http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showpo...9&postcount=84

Apparently, this poor country lawyer cannot comprehend what you say when you say it.

Maybe we should talk about irimi/tenkan prinicples in kokyu instead, then. .

I'll start -- or perhaps I have already made a small demonstration.



No offense, Mike. I forget many things, but lines of argument are not among them.

Cordially,

Erick Mead
一隻狗可久里馬房但他也不是馬的.
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