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Old 01-25-2007, 09:51 AM   #232
Eddie deGuzman
Dojo: Kuroishi/Kitakyushu
Location: Kitakyushu
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 47
Japan
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Re: Baseline skillset

Hi Eric,

It's obvious you have thought a great deal about this topic and I appreciate you taking the time to put those thoughts down for us all.

For the moment there seems to be the idea that the how of aikido can be separated from the what of aikido. And if I'm not mistaken, you take the more holistic approach wherein the how is embedded in the what, and therefore it becomes quite difficult to discuss one surface of a two surface slice of bread. Fair enough.

Mike, forgive me if I'm off base, but what I seem to be hearing from you is that the underlying how of aikido can be taught an easier way. And once this how of aikido is learned, it can be carried over to every technique, thus saving us all a couple of decades of frustration and mat time.(Not that we won't be on the mat anyway! ) Personally, I love shortcuts. Show me the way!

Eric, a couple of things I'm unclear about with your view on things...
Raul mentioned rotation so let's begin there. Am I correct in thinking that you believe all motion of the human body involves rotation? Granted, without joint manipulation there isn't much going on. But are there not different types of joints? The definition I am familiar with fits more with ball and socket movement. Pronation and supination involve rotation, yet other joints, to my knowledge, involve flexion and extension. Is this also rotation to you?

When you mention moment, are you refering to speed and not moments in time? Just trying to make it clear to myself.

As for limbs moving for opposition, it sounds very much like yin/yang, inyou principles, another subject in which I am ignorant. What I imagine here, and I may be very far off from what you have in mind, is an attack force making contact and you accept that, allowing for an opposite, perhaps equal force, remaining in balance generating more power/momentum and neutralizing the attack through redirection or perhaps ending with a pin. Am I close?

In front and behind the attacker...Sometimes, not always, working on it. Sometimes nicer when you visualize the attacker not even there.

Eric, in my dojo we do shake our hands, but I'm not sure what you mean by furitama. Tama alone means ball so I shudder to think what shaking this tama means.

Thanks again everyone for the insight. Let's keep in mind though that no matter how much we discuss water, it still won't quench our thirst.

Tomorrow is workout night, do I dare even broach the subject?

Cheers,
Eddie
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