View Single Post
Old 12-15-2006, 01:06 PM   #103
MM
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 1,996
United_States
Offline
Re: For Ted Ehara - Boundary of your aikido?

Quote:
Erick Mead wrote:
Quote:
Mark Murray wrote:
Catching air.
Now THERE is a succinct image, in every sense, of what ki and kokyu are ALL about!
Erick,
That phrase can mean many things in the world of aikido. The feeling of being uke where tori executes a technique and you feel nothing, the feeling of being tori where you execute a technique and it's like an ethereal feel, being uke for "air time" where you get a roller coaster like rush, etc, etc.

Which did you interpret it as?

Quote:
Erick Mead wrote:
Now you have also summarized the problem. What Dan, Mike, Rob and others in their circle are talking about, by your own admission is not additive within aikido, it is substituting for something else that aikido training provides. Your own language sets apart what they are showing you as something heavier, duller, less vibrant than ki and kokyu as you have experinced aikido . And yet you all seek after it.
I made a post many posts ago about putting things into what you read online. Nowhere did I say what I felt as the "replacement" was heavier, duller, or less vibrant. Perhaps I didn't explain myself properly. Let me paste my words:

Quote:
Mark Murray wrote:
I remember a time when I loved that rush. I still do, to a point. But, after experiencing a little internal "stuff" from Dan, I can actually see where that would go away. Not the fun or vibrant part, but rather something else would replace the fun and vibrant part.
To detail that a bit more. The fun or vibrant part does not go away. Let me repeat that -- the fun or vibrant part does not go away. The replacement aspect doesn't make the fun and vibrant part go away. It -- as in the "catching air" is replaced by the internal stuff. The fun or vibrant part does not go away. I can't stress that enough.

What goes away, is the aspect of "catching air" in that I wouldn't nearly take as many "breakfalls" once I learned the internal skills. And if you think that's wrong, then explain why most shihan don't take breakfalls anymore. For some reason, they too, have gone away from taking them. For me, I found a reason and can understand it.

And, IMO, what Rob, Dan, Mike, etc are talking about is what *should* be in Aikido. I would imagine that in some places, it *is* in Aikido (for example Ikeda sensei). I'd guess that those places are very rare. And the training to get there is very long. Again, IMO.

Quote:
Erick Mead wrote:
That is, in my mind, a real danger in blurring what aikido is and is not. Your own words express a sense of real loss in the effort you all are undertaking to gain somethng else -- for the purpose, I might add, of also reliving the rush of a new experience in what they are teaching.
Well, I posted a few posts ago about whatever you are putting into words on a screen comes 100%, entirely, every time, without fail from your own self. So, let me put this as clearly as I can, Erick. I have *no* sense of loss. I'm not reliving the "rush" of a new experience. You don't understand but you won't admit that.

Quote:
Erick Mead wrote:
In maturing into any art, or skill, or relationship, or faith even, the "rush" is an ephemeral thing that is often lost early on.
SNIP content

Quote:
Erick Mead wrote:
already, is the proper response in budo, as it is in love, as in faith, as in craft and all other meaningful human effort.
Sorry, Erick. If you were trying to be wise, I didn't get it. Either it doesn't apply or I'm too thick headed to understand -- or something in between. Whichever, it was lost on me.

Mark
  Reply With Quote