View Single Post
Old 10-02-2006, 09:13 PM   #98
Erick Mead
 
Erick Mead's Avatar
Dojo: Big Green Drum (W. Florida Aikikai)
Location: West Florida
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 2,441
United_States
Offline
Re: What is "Aikido"?

Quote:
Ignatius Teo wrote:
When you say "we", perhaps you mean the royal "we"?
You, me Mike, David Chi'med and anyone who remotely has attempted to imitate an aikido waza successfully.
Quote:
Ignatius Teo wrote:
What I do and teach is very simple - as it was taught to me by my teachers - a point that was consistently reinforced to me time after time - this stuff is simple.
The tools are common, the application is not. I can whack stone into chunks fairly well, but Michelangelo with the same hammer and chisel made the Pieta. It is art, it does not use any function that my body does not already have -- it lacks only a spirit and will and training.
Quote:
Ignatius Teo wrote:
I don't see any incongruence between the Laws of Physics and the East Asian teaching modality of adherence to Laws of Nature.
Because there is none.
Quote:
Ignatius Teo wrote:
As Mike has pointed out before, and I agree, these things can be described using levers, pulleys and Newtonian mechanics.
And Mike is just dead wrong on that. You cannot generate the kinetic energy by the human body in linear motion that gyration can produce and manipulate.

There is a fundamental physical reason why we abandoned the direct impulse linear piston along with the steam engine steam engine in favor of rotary driveshafts and torque converters. You can turn things faster and harder more efficiently than you can push them. Rotate the refrigerator up on one corner and spin it around 180 degrees and set it down again. Now try pushing it back. You tell me how it compares.

Gyrodynamics is entirely newtonian. Really, I haven't spun up to relativistic velocity in, oh .. must be years now

Quote:
Ignatius Teo wrote:
Not to name drop here, but Prof. Rick Clark once told me to look for the similarities rather than the differences. ...It's not that the Eastern traditions are less complex or rigorous, it's a diametrically opposed teaching modality to the modern Western perspective of "education".
That sums up what distinguishes traditional East Asian learning from Western analytical knowledge. Holistic versus reductionist. They are opposed, but only as the sets of muscles in my arm are opposed. If one set overpowers the other I am as crippled or musclebound as if I had neither. I am about rectifying the disuse of one of them in aikido.

Quote:
Ignatius Teo wrote:
The Latin root of the word "education", educaré, means to "draw out" - the very same modality by which the Eastern paradigm operates - to draw it out of the student.
In which case one only draws out what was poured in in the first place. Not an etymological argument to pursue too far. I have had many very good lessons forcefully impressed into me ... But, in granting your point, it shows the importance of finding common references to deeper relevant Western physical knowledge (and other types I might add).

Cordially,

Erick Mead
一隻狗可久里馬房但他也不是馬的.
  Reply With Quote