View Single Post
Old 09-25-2006, 12:46 PM   #4
George S. Ledyard
 
George S. Ledyard's Avatar
Dojo: Aikido Eastside
Location: Bellevue, WA
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 2,623
Offline
Re: Internet visible classes

Quote:
John Riggs wrote:
My step son has set up a netmeeting system and I will be able to broadcast classes and hopefully seminars from the dojo to the internet so anyone can watch.

We have to overcome the firewall issue but should have it up and running on Thursday.

I did this for a couple of my remote instructors but it can also be used to watch seminars and classes.

The IP address will be 192.168.0.106.

If you have Windows XP go to run and type in config.exe. It will install net meeting.

We have a camera set up in the dojo and it should be able to broadcast video and audio.
This is an idea that has great appeal in some ways. I would caution you that there could be some resistance from senior teachers. Many of us are professional teachers. I can't really support myself on what the dojo alone brings in so I depend on seminar income for my living. I also have been developing a significant video business which augments my seminar income. All put together I just about get by.

I spend alot of time and effort developing the content I present to the students at the venues where I teach. I spend a lot of money on my own training so that I keep myself growing. My teaching supports that. When folks invite me to teach or buy my videos they are investing in my future efforts by supporting me. In return I deliver the best Aikido training I possibly can.

I, for one, would have a bit of a problem putting my stuff out there to folks who have made no investment of their time, money, and sweat to get the instruction. Right now, I will teach a seminar there may be a video that comes out of it. Folks can buy the video for quite a bit less than they would have had to pay to attend the seminar but they sacrifice the personal attention they'd get if they had been at the training so it's still a reasonable exchange. But simply putting my stuff out there for folks who are not my students, who have made no investment in myself as a teacher, and have to make no commitment of themselves beyond accessing the net is problematical for me. It is so for financial reasons in that I am undercutting myself by putting my stuff out there on the net like that and it is so for the reason that there is virtually no personal exchange, not even the exchange of information that takes place when someone buys my videos.

I think that many folks who have spent their entire adult lives mastering the principles of the art and learning how to teach it (not to mention how much financial investment they made in their training over the years to get there) would have some reluctance just to throw the stuff out onto the net for all to see without any need to make any investment of time, effort, or money on their parts.

On the other hand... if the technology could be harnessed in a commercial fashion, it could open up incredible possibilities. Right now, small dojos have a hard time hosting a senior teacher. it is too expensive. If they could subsidize participation with an on-line broadcast they could host anyone they wished. Seminars could be hosted which, not only could benefit the visiting instructor but could very well be profitable enough to to give significant support to the dojo itself.

Also, a teacher in a given dojo, who might always be on the edge of financial disaster, might be able to offer material this way that would make the difference financially. It might also be an excellent way for second tier teachers, who have not yet developed a significant reputation to put their stuff out there for folks to see. They might be able to get the exposure they need to start getting invitations to teach or to sell their own videos etc.It could be an excellent marketing opportunity if used correctly.

Just my thoughts...

Last edited by George S. Ledyard : 09-25-2006 at 12:49 PM.

George S. Ledyard
Aikido Eastside
Bellevue, WA
Aikido Eastside
AikidoDvds.Com
  Reply With Quote