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Old 08-07-2000, 04:50 PM   #5
smithid
Dojo: Tacoma Aiki Dojo
Location: Olympia, WA
Join Date: Aug 2000
Posts: 3
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Problem with locks on street

I have two problems with using ikkyo, nikkyo, sankyo, and shiho nage in street situations:

(1) At full speed street attack level you cannot get usually them 99 times out of 100 unless you first so rattle the attacker with atemis that ANYTHING is then relatively easy to do (i.e., the locks become unnecessary).
(2) If you DO get them and try to slow down enough to NOT dislocate the attacker's joints, the serious attacker will then usually escape the hold. Most police I know using immobilization techniques report that the joints DO get injured unless there is instant compliance from the suspect.

No one is aware of what Ota Sensei is doing as described in the AIKIDO TODAY interview I quoted above?

I do thank the three kind people who answered my long question so far. My interest is in doing what I now understand to be possible - true full speed Aikido. Your points regarding slowing down seem to be the whole problem with the immobilization techniques - they break the flow and have high risk of injury in practice. Breath throws don't. Look at high speed Judo competition. Taking falls is a prerequisite for high speed randori.

Let me be perfectly clear. I understand that FULL SPEED randori WITHOUT causing serious injury to ukes is not only possible but has been the norm for many years at Ota Sensei's dojo in California. This is his bold and challenging claim.

Assuming (as I do) that this is a true report, then I am wondering if part of the key to achieving this level of training comes from NOT including ikkyo, nikkyo, sankyo and shiho nage as these are incredibly inclined toward severe joint injury when applied at full street speed. And yes, I am speaking of full speed by the nage in performing the throws.

Any further comments or suggestions are deeply appreciated. Thank again to those who have already pitched in.

George Smith
smithid@ix.netcom.com
Tacoma Aiki Dojo
Volunteer instructor Lakewood YMCA
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