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Old 07-23-2006, 08:18 AM   #22
Jorge Garcia
Dojo: Shudokan School of Aikido
Location: Houston
Join Date: Jun 2001
Posts: 608
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Re: Aikido on the ground, questions.

I don't think Aikido practitioners need to worry about knowing BJJ or Judo. They need to worry about learning to keep their centers while they do Aikido. That's the training that will save their lives.
1) If you stay safe , make wise decisions, and use your common sense, you should never be in a fight in your whole life. That's what many 70+ men have told me. I am 50 years old. I came from a neighborhood where there were fights every day, and there, I learned to stay out of fights- not get into them.
2) Per chance if I was attacked, the chances of a BJJ man attacking me are so statistically slim, that it almost has no chance of happening. I have no fear of a good Judo man or BJJ man attacking me. I am 50 years old and it hasn't happened yet. In fact, I have never been attacked by another martial artist at all.
3) I have seen plenty of fights growing up and they were all street fights and I never saw a person fighting on the ground except for the one who had been knocked out (he was down there alone) or the one that the gang was kicking ( he also was down there alone). Street fighters stay off the ground if they expect to win. The ground means you have lost your fight. The ground in the streets is not an objective you train for. Their buddies always make the ground a place where 9 people kick you - not a place where you fantasize you will win, one on one.
4) Swazi waza is a training to keep your center. In our dojo, if a person can be pushed over in swari waza, we do it. I had a big guy try to push me over yesterday and just for fun (I am the teacher) I took him down and told him to get me off of him. He struggled for 5 minutes and couldn't do it. I laid on him, pinned him in various ways, shifted my weight and he couldn't get me off or hit me. There I was, a person with no Judo or BJJ training and another normal person couldn't get me off of him. That says to me my current training is sufficient. If I am attacked by a BJJ Man, it will just have to be my tough luck. If train for that, I might as well train for a 7 ft, 500 pound man attacking me or maybe I could train for a Krav Maga spy killer attacking me.

My point is that no one can train for every conceivable situation. To try to do so is to dilute your training because of limited time to train in everything for everything.The idea of being able to train for every situation is an impossible fantasy and a self delusion (with all due respect).

5) "Ninety percent of all fights end up on the ground" Can someone give me the scientific research for that statistic. I am not talking about the MMA, UFC or any sport art or contest. I am talking about 90% of all the fights. Who was there at "all the fights"?!!
That's a statistic that can't be proven.
I think that would not mean that 90% of all Aikido practitioners of at least 10 years training could be taken down by an average Joe. If you are attacked once in your life, you have a good chance (since it will be so rare), of having significant Aikido training by then. Your chances are almost 90% that attack will occur by an average person with no martial arts training (stay out of my barrio at night!) so I say you will be able to stay up if you keep your center.
I return to my original statement.
I don't think Aikido practitioners need to worry about knowing BJJ or Judo. They need to worry about learning to keep their centers while they do Aikido. That's the training that will save their lives.

Finally, if all this fails to convince, I need all the BJJ people on this board to describe the last legitimate real fight or attack you had, unrehearsed and unplanned,( a real street attack) describe how you ended up on the ground and how you defended yourself with BJJ . With all this training for the ground, it must surely happen a lot.


Thanks for putting up with me. I feel better now. Back to my normal life.
With a little "tongue in cheek",

"It is the philosophy that gives meaning to the method of training."
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