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Old 06-05-2006, 06:08 AM   #27
DonMagee
Location: Indiana
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 1,311
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Re: Mixing Aikido with other martial arts

Quote:
Jorge Garcia wrote:
Mike,
1) Who would have time to learn so many arts? One is hard enough.
Very true, its hard to find the time. But that is not to say you need the same level of skill and training in all arts. If I love striking, I still need to learn how to defend myself on the ground, at least to the point that I will have a chance to counter take downs or stand back up. Maybe I could learn bjj once a week or once every other week with my karate 3 times a week.

Quote:
Jorge Garcia wrote:
2) Who says you would be any good at arts # 2, 3, and 4? I know a guy that has been doing BJJ for years and the other guys just sit on him and yawn while he struggles to get away. I took him down and sat on him myself and I have never done BJJ.
All the more reason to cross train, who is to say you dont suck at aikido. Maybe you spend 10 years in aikido and find out you can't really use any of it. But seriously, I was kidding there. Its not about not being able to gain skill, its about dedication. If you friend has done bjj for years and can't handle people on the ground, he probably hasn't dedicated any time to it. What would you tell someone who has done aikido for years and still sucks at it?

Quote:
Jorge Garcia wrote:
3) What if you learned 7 martial arts and the other guy pulled a gun from 10 feet away.
I'd give him my wallet. Unless you know a martial art for 10 foot gun disarms?

Quote:
Jorge Garcia wrote:
4) What insecurity drives a person to need self defense so badly, that you have to learn 3 or 4 martial arts?
Insecurity? I'm not insecure in the least. Although I dont train martial arts for self defense. I train them for self betterment.(is that a word?). For my sport, I have to be able to strike, throw and grapple. If I didn't train in any of those areas I would not be able to compete in my sport. I really dont think you need 4 arts for self defense. For self defense you need to be familiar with striking, clinching/throwing, and ground work. And most importantly you need to be comfortable with aggression and in good physical shape. If you get out of breath walking up a small flight of stairs, your chances of surviving an encouter with a mugger are slim. If you have never been punched in the face before, your chances of keeping your cool when it happens are also slim.
Quote:
Jorge Garcia wrote:
5) How many people that comment on a thread like this have done Aikido long enough to start to understand it. I have been studying it for 11 years and I am just starting to barely understand what my teacher explains to me and shows me.
This is why I dont feel aikido is good for people who's main concern is self defense. If you are worried about self defense, you should be worried about it now. Not 15 years from now. You can be good enough in bjj, boxing, judo, etc in a few months. It takes years to have an resemblance of skill in aikido.

Quote:
Jorge Garcia wrote:
6) How many people commenting on a this thread don't actually practice Aikido (You know who you are) or only practiced it at a kyu level?
I am a kyu rank. Of course I dont claim you can't use aikido for self defense. I just claim its not the best course (mainly because of its training methods and time requires to gain skill).
Quote:
Jorge Garcia wrote:
7) Does the philosophy of all these arts make a difference to anyone out there or are we just looking for raw or brute techniques? (By that I mean form with no meaning).
I personally dont care for philosophy. I read it, study it, and make up my own mind. But I really feel that at high levels of any arts all the roads lead to the same place.

Quote:
Jorge Garcia wrote:
8) Can the people that believe in the mixed martial art to get a better martial art theory really explain the philosophy of Aikido or has that thought never crossed our minds? This is a most important point because if Aikido has poor groundwork or no punching like karate or lacks anything at all, why would a martial artist like Morihei Ueshiba create something like that? Was he ignorant? Did he lack Ideas? Didn't he realize what a good punch in the nose could do?
I personally think the reason Ueshiba did not include striking and ground work is that his students were accomplished martial artists. He was refining their techniques and showing them a better path. He did not need to teach them how to punch/kick/choke someone on the ground. The problem today is that most aikido students seem to have no real background in martial arts. They jump right into aikido and are not taught the 'basics' of unarmed fighting. And then their instructor will tell them to throw some atemi in. Would it not be proper to teach proper atemi if you are going to advocate it to your students? Ueshiba was also trained on the ground (there are photo's on the web with him doing ground work). Who is to say he didnt' agree with it, but simply didnt' teach it because his students were already good enough on the ground, and aikido is not about teaching someone to fight?

- Don
"If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough" - Albert Einstein
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