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Old 02-22-2006, 05:49 PM   #5
pezalinski
 
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Dojo: Aikido of Harvard (IL)
Location: harvard, IL
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Re: Article: Apples and Oranges; State Specific Learning by Lynn Seiser

Quote:
Ignatius Teo wrote:
i.e. wouldn't it be easier to see the connections, and thus enhancing the level of understanding of and between similar patterned relationships and similarities in principle application thru a number of different arts concurrently?

If they share the same context, then definitely YES. I still think you need need to become grounded in one art, to at least some degree, to develop the understanding of the "language" of martial arts, and how you move, react, and harmonize within that context, before exploring a separate art. But, if they share a common context (Bokken-waza/tori, Jo-waza-tori, Aikido-waza), then it makes sense to practice them concurrently.

If not, (like aikido and coepira) then not.

I think of it like learning languages: Assume the two languages are both related Romance languages, like Italian and Spanish, and assuming that I do NOT compartmentalize my learning -- If I try to acquire the languages at the same time, from the same starting point, I will probably get quite confused by the testing, and score poorly -- confusing one language for the other. So, by simile -- learning Jujitsu and Aikido at the same time could be a bit confusing, at first

(Hmmm -- no wonder I was confused, when someone put a stick in my hand and called it "Joe")

If I know one of the two languages, I can make myself understood in the other with a little practice (and patience on the listeners' part) because they are related... So, if I am a fluent speaker of Italian, and chose to study Spanish, I could probably pick it up very rapidly, noting the differences and the similarities and conceptualizing the resulting language as a variant of what I already know.

So, by simile, adding Jujitsu to my Aikido would be a easier acquisition than adding Coepira; If the vocabularies and languages-of-movement are completely different, they are therefore more easy to compartmentalize and less likely that skill in one would lead to quick advancement in the other.

IMHO, of course.


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