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Old 11-23-2005, 11:38 PM   #20
ald1225
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 17
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Re: Aikido against judo

Quote:
Keane Lee wrote:
Sorry i know this topic has probably been brought up like 1232144 times,but i seriously need to know whether if you guys are confident to take on and judokas or grapplers?I remember reading a book about Koichi Tohei sensei, he had no problem taking on judokas or anybody.And from what i read it seem like Aikido is able to counter Judo easily.Tohei sensei and his students had no problem.But personally,when my friends try wrestling and stuff,i cant seem to defend myself properly.Though it's playing,i tried my best,but still.. Thats why i have been questioning myself whether if i have been practicing correctly?or why is it my aikido isnt effective?Aikido is suppose to be able to defend against ppl that are bigger, but i seem to have no confidence in doing that..i cant even defend myself against a friendly game with my friends.So can anyone help me pls?

Intersting enough that no one from Ki Society (founded by Tohei Sensei) has answered yet (I think) but I will try. For some weird reason, there's some martial artists that comes/used to come to our dojo to have training in They try to challenge the dojo's sensei yet they were sent by their actual sensei to train in ki. They get so frustrated because they've been training for several years now (some are even are blackbelts in other arts), yet they don't know this concept.

We also get a lot of harsh criticisism from the aikido community because we are the "not so simple to understand, so soft" than "normal aikido"

My advice to you relax completely and keep your weight underside.

Anyway here's a blurp from a Ki Society site:
"We practice to feel the intent before the fist. When an opponent is very close, we must move on this intuitive feeling. A good punch or kick thrown at close range moves too quickly to react to. So we don't look at hands or legs or even weapons, but take in the whole person. When distance allows, we are still sensitive to the opponent's Ki, but move a little later once the attack is committed."


http://www.geocities.com/tedehara/ks_archive.htm#study
http://hometown.aol.com/trcaikido/index.html
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