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Old 11-21-2005, 02:36 AM   #7
Kevin Leavitt
 
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Dojo: Aikido of Northern Virginia
Location: Stuttgart, Baden Wurttemberg
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 4,376
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Re: Article: On the Interdependent Nature of Tactics and Strategies by "The Grindstone"

This is the best thread I have seen in a long time! Wow!

I struggle with these very issues. How do you balance "fighting" and budo? It is not easy.

Me dealing with Army combatives program...well the major intent of the program is not to necessarily develop fighitng skills but instill the warrior spirit (Budo)...

BUT, talk about budo to any of the guys I train with and they will call you a "homo" and never come back!!

They care about the effectiveness and the efficiency of what they are studying, however, what they really get out of it is BUDO!!!

Out of 200 soldiers I train, I have a handful of guys that have taken to martial arts. I even have about 7 now that will incorporate aikido into our training. These 7 are starting to "listen" to the situations, they are developing finer skills of blending etc. They are beginning to understand mushin, and ma ai.

Talk to any world class athlete and you will find that they indeed embody the same concepts of BUDO, (that is throwing out the professional basketball, football, and baseball players that act like spoiled brats!).

I think all great "fighters" like the guys in the UFC really "get it". They may not outwardly talk about it...but they are warriors.

But what separates "fighters" and "budoka"? We all seem to know that there is something different between them...what is it?

Is it because fighters have a endstate of Winning regardless of your position? WIN/LOSE and Budoka have a WIN/WIN endstate.

I think it is not quite this easy.

Even in the UFC, yes, one fighter wins and the other loses on the surface....but look what happens after the fight...they are both WINNERS! They both typically have the utmost respect for each other and share a common bond!

So, what is it that separates fighters from budoka...is it ethical goals? Do budoka focus more on trying to resolve conflict and create a better world through martial arts?

Interesting conversation!
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