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Old 09-30-2005, 03:16 PM   #1
Janet Rosen
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Location: Left Coast
Join Date: May 2002
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committed attack/sensitive ukemi paradox

I said over in Paula's thread: "I agree that this type of attack is not consistently taught well in all dojos, and I for one know that I have problems consistently delivering them...maybe I should spin off another thread hmmm......"
So here is one puzzle I'm finding coming up a lot. I will give a focussed, intent attack once or twice then start getting a little sloppy...ok, so that is a matter of discipline and focus...But another side of the coin I've been playing with is being a connected "sticky" uke, trying not to bail but to be relaxed enough to be really responsive.
And I find that the two modes are somatically very different for me and I cannot "switch" well. If I give the kind of very focussed intent attack empty hand that I'd be giving in partnered weapons work, I'm bringing a certain solidity to it, a feeling that I will reach my goal with my center/posture intact. If nage moves and I'm somewhat imbalanced (which would be considered a good next step in the interaction...) my tendency is to stay in "solid" mode -- thinking about it now as I write, I'm probably momentarily freezing? tensing? as a reaction to the imbalance? -- and I have to consciously switch gears as nage continues to connect/engage "oh right, there's nage feel the connection, ok, here we go...".
So I think PART of why my attacks go a bit slack is that I'm focussing (too much) on anticipating the connection/response aspect of ukemi and not on the initial attack that is actually what gives nage what he needs...
So...my question is: is there a degree of relaxation one learns over time within the committed, intense attack, that permits the seamless transition to connected ukemi?
I hope this question makes sense...it is something that just occured to me though the problem is not a new one for me.

Janet Rosen
http://www.zanshinart.com
"peace will enter when hate is gone"--percy mayfield
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