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Old 09-07-2005, 05:58 PM   #15
Misogi-no-Gyo
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 498
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Re: Omoto-kyo Theology

Quote:
David Valadez wrote:
Hi Shaun,

Thanks for chiming in.

I will try and be brief -- as requested.
And I thank you for doing so. It allows me to quickly post some things on which I would love for you to comment.
Quote:
David Valadez wrote:
No, I do not have any nor do I know of any original sources whereby Osensei can be quoted as saying "This I am basing on Omoto-kyo" (or some other variant), etc.
Thank you.
Quote:
David Valadez wrote:
As for second hand sources, there are only those various figures inside and outside of Aikido that mention the influence that Omoto-kyo theology had on Osensei.
Again, thank you.
Quote:
David Valadez wrote:
However, there is no other secondhand source that I know of that has someone saying "Osensei told me that he got this from Omoto-kyo." All of them only talk about the influence the theology had on him -- as they witnessed it secondhand.
Yes, these individuals might very well consider Omoto-Kyo to have been the source. Of course, that does not make it so, as I am sure you will agree.
Quote:
David Valadez wrote:
In short, as I said above, and in the essay, this is the hypothesis of the whole piece: That Osensei's thought has been heavily influenced by Omoto-kyo theology. As a hypothesis it is not something I would expect to be provable in any kind of direct way.
I can not thank you enough for this clear and concise way of asking your readers to approach your material. In that vein, speaking in terms of hypothesis, (regardless of any of it being right or wrong) it will no doubt give many people much to consider within the context of their own practice and life. It therefore is a effort that is well intended and allows for a powerful reception as a tool for self analysis.
Quote:
David Valadez wrote:
Your second question is one I would see as requiring a very long response, one I am not sure I am even yet able to write. I am sorry.
No apologies necessary, as we are both perhaps in a similar place.

Quote:
David Valadez wrote:
Let me say this though -- still trying to be brief. The question as I understand it can be taken in three ways: a) How does Omoto-kyo suggest we apply ichirei-shikon in our lives (since they may not at all be talking about Aikido); b) How does Osensei suggest we apply ichirei-shikon in our lives (since he most likely will talk about Aikido); and c) How can we apply ichirei-shikon in our lives.
I would say that my question, as stated was with regards to "B" above.
Quote:
David Valadez wrote:
For the first two takes on this question, more historical analysis will have to be done.
I would agree, and I would like to discuss this privately with you, if you are interested.
Quote:
David Valadez wrote:
Outside of this, I am afraid I have not formulated for mass consumption (i.e. in brief form) my own practice nor my own pedagogical slant concerning such things as they are played out in our dojo. I hope that one day I will be able to do so.
As do I for my own group.

Here are some thoughts I penned while awaiting your reply.
  • O-Sensei said Aikido is not a religion but the completion of all religions. Wouldn't that also include Omoto-Kyo? followed by...
  • O-Sensei said it is not necessary to follow his religious path in order to learn Aikido. If this is so, why should non-Japanese follow Omoto-Kyo theology? If this is not so, how are non-Japanese, or non-Omoto-Kyo followers supposed to follow along the overly complex theological path?
  • Is it not more likely that the path is very simple, and the entrance to the path well hidden, rather than finding any answer by subscribing to a religion that forces the entire world to have to follow some overly complex theology which can barely be understood in any practical sense, even by those who are practicing it?
  • Is it not more likely that O-Sensei, noted as a very practical man (exemplified by his decision to move forward from his Daito-Ryu practice) would seek to put his efforts into developing a practice that would circumvent the need to over-think the world, one that is an ill-fitting response to that mystical nature of the universe as sold to us by all the priests of all religions? Would he not prefer a process that would short circuit the complex God/man, Shame/Blame & it's not the same games proffered by religions since time memoriam, so as to give people what he considered a direct path as opposed to one based upon the empty concept of "faith" and isn't that something called Aikido?
  • If we accept (only for this moment) that O-Sensei came up with something different, something more direct, and look at his art from that possibility, does Aikido not become the art that he felt could be easily adopted by people of all nationalities, cultures, age or what have you, just like he said it was?
Please feel free to comment on any, all or none as you see fit. Knowing what a great amount of time and effort you put into all of your posts, please feel free to respond to them individually or in groups or as you like.

Given the depth of the content and the length of the posts, I would like to emphasize this particular comment that you made:
Quote:
David Valadez wrote:
Personally, I would never say which one is the more valid tradition in terms of history or in terms of understanding Aikido as Osensei may have understood Aikido. Both seem to have their possible flaws -- as the former can often be reduced to a fetishization of the mundane and the latter can often end in a paralysis of analysis. Moreover, the "in between" areas are too grey to make any kind of assertion practical.
Personally, I can't find one other thing which you have written that I would agree with more than the above comments. It seems that the answer is very simple, but somehow simply hidden, just as it was before... That is why we must look towards the practical not the mystical when approaching O-Sensei. By the way, your particular phrasing of paralysis of analysis is a rare and priceless gem. May I borrow it on occasion?
Quote:
David Valadez wrote:
I too look forward to meeting one day -- it would be a great thing to discuss many of these issues, and other issues as well, with you. Please always consider yourself welcome at our dojo. This next year, I am planning to attend the Expo -- so hopefully you will be going to the next one as well and I can meet your there.
Thank you. I hope to have the time to at least come by your dojo and pay my respects at the Kamiza. As for the Expo, as I plan to attend each and every one while they are here in the States, I am sure to be there.



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