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Old 04-12-2005, 09:44 PM   #57
rob_liberti
Dojo: Shobu Aikido of Connecticut
Location: East Haven, CT
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 1,402
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Re: causing no (serious) harm

(I haven't had a moment to read your article yet, but I wanted to respond to what you wrote here while I had a moment.)

Quote:
one could even argue that Osensei shows more signs of not understanding the modern ranking system than of understanding it -- as there are historical examples where he subverted such a system via things like "over-promotion,"
Sometimes when someone understands the rules extremely well, they know them well enough to know when it is appropriate to subvert them. I heard a story that one day George Osawa and a bunch of his macrobiotic followers where in a train station in Japan. Some of the followers were a bit upset because they were all very hungry but all they could find was white rice. I believe that he simply explained that eating white rice one time wouldn't kill them.

It seems to me that it can be both "discover a new non-lethal technology" AND "to purify from our own heart/minds the will to violence and all that supports it".

Quote:
By leaving our training lethal and by working upon ourselves along a keen martial edge so that we do not ever need to employ it. As we improve, our art should simply get more lethal, and thus more capable of honing our body/mind so that it does not require of us to act out violently.
While I certainly agree with this, I am skeptical about the depth of the progress we will make if we do that while not constantly working towards actively choosing to do the least amount of damage. From my perspective, all lethal with no challenge to find an equally effective no-damage solution seems to lead to an equally mundane art as well.

Rob
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