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CollinHall 02-09-2005 11:37 AM

Names
 
Can anyone give me advice on remembering the names of the tecniques??? i have been having trouble remebering... although what has been working is when i go for an exam i write down the names of the tecniqes i was testing for and try to remember it that way is that any good???

Greg Jennings 02-09-2005 11:43 AM

Re: Names
 
Break the names down to their component parts and learn what the name means...

E.g., Shomenuchi Ikkyo Omote Kihon

Sho = Beginning
Men = Head
Uchi = (in this case) Strike
Ik = First
Kyo = Teaching
Omote = To the front
Kihon = Basic

If you "break the code" that way, things will come to you much easier. But you still have to learn what separates, for example ikkyo from nikyo.

Best regards,

CollinHall 02-09-2005 11:48 AM

Re: Names
 
Thanks Greg.. i never knew what the names ment.. im going to save your reply for futer use.... that is another thing that i love about aikido.. is that it requires some language learning and i find that fascinating.... thanks again...

akiy 02-09-2005 11:59 AM

Re: Names
 
Quote:

Greg Jennings wrote:
Sho = Beginning

Actually, the "sho" in this case isn't the same as the one in "shodan." Rather, it means "correct, justice, righteous" or "true, regular." It's also used in the Japanese term "tadashii" and can also be read as "sei."

-- Jun

bryce_montgomery 02-09-2005 12:04 PM

Re: Names
 
Here's a website that my instructor has on our website that provides a nice list of the English translations of a good deal of aikido terms. It also has the kanji that corresponds with the Japanese term. It should help you out a little...

http://www.ne.jp/asahi/dji/home/aikilex/enlex.pdf

Bryce

Greg Jennings 02-09-2005 12:41 PM

Re: Names
 
Quote:

Jun Akiyama wrote:
Actually, the "sho" in this case isn't the same as the one in "shodan." Rather, it means "correct, justice, righteous" or "true, regular." It's also used in the Japanese term "tadashii" and can also be read as "sei."

Dang, Jun, now I don't understand "Shomen", anymore... I've seen it translated as "Straight Face", but that didn't seem right, either.

How would you read it in context?

Best,

akiy 02-09-2005 12:48 PM

Re: Names
 
Hi Greg,

Just as a clarification, the "sho" in "shodan" is short; the "sho" in "shomen" is long (ie "shoumen").

Personally, I take the word "shomen" to denote the "proper side" of something -- like the "front" side of a house. "Men" can mean both "surface" (as in the two surfaces of a piece of paper) or "face" (as in where one's eyes, nose, mouth, etc are located). Thus, one might define "shomen" in the context of "shomen uchi" to be as "striking the proper side (ie front) side of the face" (as opposed to, say, yokomen uchi).

I'd be interested in hearing other thoughts about the term, though.

-- Jun

Greg Jennings 02-09-2005 01:18 PM

Re: Names
 
Hi Jun,
That makes sense. I appreciate it.

I don't want to hijack this thread, but I've always thought that there are several flavors of the general thing called "shoumen uchi" and they are different enough that it makes it difficult to discuss technique.

Best regards,

Peter Goldsbury 02-09-2005 06:46 PM

Re: Names
 
Quote:

Jun Akiyama wrote:
Hi Greg,

Just as a clarification, the "sho" in "shodan" is short; the "sho" in "shomen" is long (ie "shoumen").

Personally, I take the word "shomen" to denote the "proper side" of something -- like the "front" side of a house. "Men" can mean both "surface" (as in the two surfaces of a piece of paper) or "face" (as in where one's eyes, nose, mouth, etc are located). Thus, one might define "shomen" in the context of "shomen uchi" to be as "striking the proper side (ie front) side of the face" (as opposed to, say, yokomen uchi).

I'd be interested in hearing other thoughts about the term, though.

-- Jun

Here are some compounds with the word SHOU and MEN.

SHOU:
sei-san-kak-kei: equilateral triangle
shou-gatsu: new year; January
sei-han-tai: exact opposite
sei-tou-bou-ei: legitimate self defence
shou-jiki: honest
sei-za: sitting straight/properly (on one's heels)
sei-jou: normal
sei-tou-ha: fundamentalist
sei-kaku: accurate

MEN (can also be read as OMO(TE)
omo-shiroi (= face + white): interesting
men-setsu: interview
omo-wasure: fail to recognize
men-dou-kusai: bothersome
ichi-men-kan: one-sided view
fuku-men-pato-kaa: unmarked police patrol car
shoumen: front, head-on

ta-men-tai: polyhedron
ga-men: scene. TV screen

An eminent shihan once explained to me that 'shoumen' was facing the Imperial Palace.

Note that 'shoumen' can also be read as 'matomo'. The Chinese characters are the same, but the reading is the Japanese kun reading. 'Matomo-ni-kao-wo-miru' means to look at a person full in the face. 'Matomoni butsukaru' = crash into something head-on.

It can also mean 'honest', 'straight', 'upright'. 'Matomona shoubai' is honest business and 'matomomo ni kurasu' is to live an honest life.

End of lecture :)

akiy 02-09-2005 11:28 PM

Re: Names
 
Quote:

Peter A Goldsbury wrote:
End of lecture :)

Thank you, Peter! I wish the lectures I've received in my life could have been as interesting as the ones you've given...

-- Jun

asiawide 02-10-2005 12:58 AM

Re: Names
 
Each kanji has meaning and sound. SHO in 'shodan' and 'shomen' sound same but have different meaning. Even Japanese have difficulity on pronouncing kanji correctly.

Even though you know the meaning of each kanji, you can't guess all the words. It's better to memorize name of techniques as a word. You know even japanese don't know the meaning of 'Aiki'. 99% of people can read it and know meaning of each kanji but they don't know the meaning of 'aiki' :)

SeiserL 02-10-2005 09:33 AM

Re: Names
 
I tend to use association and repetition in three sensory representational systems to help remember. As I watch (visual) or do (feeling) a technique, I see (visual) the name written on it, I move slightly with it (feeling), and say (auditory) the name to myself. After a while of repetition, it associates and I get it.

Understanding the component meanings, as described far better than I could, is also very helpful. Try to actually see and feel it as you understand (hear) it.

Bronson 02-10-2005 09:47 AM

Re: Names
 
What Greg suggested worked for me. I also made flash cards that I carried with me.

A game I used to play in my head was to try to name what was being demonstrated. Our instructors always ask if there are any questions after they've finished the demonstration so I'd ask the name (if they hadn't already told us) sometimes I had it right and sometimes I was waaaay off, but I felt the process of thinking about it and making the connections was valuable.

Bronson


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