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-   -   Japanese sword on the History Channel (http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showthread.php?t=6933)

batemanb 11-17-2004 06:27 AM

Japanese sword on the History Channel
 
I don't know if it is a repeat or has been on in other countries yet, but there is a "new" series advertised called The Master, starting on the History Channel this Sunday at 20:00 UTC (GMT to us oldies) here in the UK (repeated Monday lunchtime).

The first episode is all about Japanese Swordsmiths and making Katana.

rgds

Bryan

Solarius 11-17-2004 06:29 AM

Re: Japanese sword on the History Channel
 
Damn, I don't have history channel...

thomas_dixon 11-17-2004 06:45 AM

Re: Japanese sword on the History Channel
 
w00t! *goes to check it out*

& Dai, do you live in the Vilinus as in the WWII Vilinus?

Solarius 11-17-2004 06:53 AM

Re: Japanese sword on the History Channel
 
Quote:

Thomas Dixon wrote:
w00t! *goes to check it out*

& Dai, do you live in the Vilinus as in the WWII Vilinus?

:D

It's Vil-n-i-us, the capital of Lithuania. What's a 'WWII Vilinus'?

batemanb 11-17-2004 07:12 AM

Re: Japanese sword on the History Channel
 
Quote:

Thomas Dixon wrote:
w00t! *goes to check it out

If you go here

http://www.thehistorychannel.co.uk/_...lash/index.php

then type the master in the search bar it will bring up more info on the episode. I couldn't get the direct URL for some reason.

OR even watch the flash on the main page, The Master comes up every one in three rotations :)

rgds

dan guthrie 11-17-2004 07:40 AM

Re: Japanese sword on the History Channel
 
When you search the History channel.com for "sword" this is what you get:

Wed, November 24 12-1pm

Modern Marvels
Axes, Swords and Knives.

Wed, November 24 6-7pm

Modern Marvels
Axes, Swords and Knives.

There's nothing specific mentioned about Japanese swords in the listings. I think I've seen this before and there is a short portion devoted to Japanese sword-making.

batemanb 11-17-2004 07:57 AM

Re: Japanese sword on the History Channel
 
Doesn't appear to be listed on the US site :(

The UK commercial is billing the first episode as a programme about the Japanese swordsmith, here's the blurb on the UK site

Master Swordsmith of Imperial Japan

To be a master swordsmith in 13th-century Japan was to hold a position of exceptional respect and authority. Masamune was the supreme practitioner in this, the golden age of the sword. In the face of Mongol invasions the Emperor's rule had broken down.

Great power was held by the Samurai, mercenary warriors who enjoyed high social status and wealth in return for their military service. Famed for their fighting skills, bravery and loyalty, the Samurai followed an ancient code of honour that permeates Japanese society to this day.

"The way of the sword" - the ancient art of Iaido - was crucial to the Samurai. Iaido focuses on the expert use of the Katana (curved sword) and the discipline of mind and body.

Remarkably light and easy to handle, the Katana was an extremely sharp, strong and durable weapon. In the hands of a Samurai they were lethal. The Katana is still a central part of Japanese culture.

In Japan's creation myth the Empress Sun God hands her grandson a sword as he descends to rule on earth. The sword was an extension of the warrior's soul. Thus the smiths who crafted these weapons were venerated as priests. Masamune was Japan's greatest ever swordsmith, his most prolific period coming at the time of the Second Mongol invasion in 1281. The Katanas he crafted had mythical and spiritual qualities, and a single blade could take up to 90 days to forge.


rgds

Bob Heffner 11-17-2004 10:59 AM

Re: Japanese sword on the History Channel
 
For those of you who live in the States and have FiTv, on Saturday night (11/20) they have two shows on the Martial Arts. Not sure if they new or repeats. I don't think they are specifically about Swords, but Martial Arts in general.

Enjoy

batemanb 11-22-2004 02:14 AM

Re: Japanese sword on the History Channel
 
I watched this last night, very fascinating indeed. It is worth catching if you get a chance to watch it. My only quibble, and it goes for pretty much every documentary I see on MA/ Japanese related topics, is that the narrators learn to pronounce the Japanese names correctly, it's not bloody pronounced sam you rai, it's pronounced sa moo rai! I won't even go into the Japanese sword expert at the Victoria & Albert museum's pronounciation of Masamune! <rant over> :)

rgds

Bryan

Peter Seth 11-22-2004 06:01 AM

Re: Japanese sword on the History Channel
 
Just as a comparison, there is (and deservedly so) lots of praise and sometimes awe ascribed to the Japanese sword and the artistry of the master weapons makers. There is also other areas of the world which had a long history of weapons manufacture which rivals that of Japan, eg: Toledo and the Arab master weapons smiths. Even less well known are the weapons makers of the Celtic/Saxon era in Britain and Europe, whose technology was equally advanced though slightly different. In a recent programme on weapons, the british/european sword was investigated. The best examples were made, not by folding, but by twisting together different types of steel and then forging these together in the correct order to make the back, central core and the harder edge. This resulted in a weapon with similar characteristics as a 'ken' but with a beautiful sinuous pattern which ran throughout the sword. Quite often this pattern could be interpreted (with imagination) as for example the marks on a vipers skin, a dragon, etc,etc, and therefore would be named
to suit the pattern. I sometimes think European martial arts are neglected in the same manner, Europe/Britain is rich with many diverse martial arts (and weapons, some very wierd), which rival any in the east. But thats another story

dan guthrie 11-22-2004 02:58 PM

Re: Japanese sword on the History Channel
 
Quote:

Peter Seth wrote:
Just as a comparison, there is (and deservedly so) lots of praise and sometimes awe ascribed to the Japanese sword and the artistry of the master weapons makers. There is also other areas of the world which had a long history of weapons manufacture which rivals that of Japan, eg: Toledo and the Arab master weapons smiths. Even less well known are the weapons makers of the Celtic/Saxon era in Britain and Europe, whose technology was equally advanced though slightly different. In a recent programme on weapons, the british/european sword was investigated. The best examples were made, not by folding, but by twisting together different types of steel and then forging these together in the correct order to make the back, central core and the harder edge. This resulted in a weapon with similar characteristics as a 'ken' but with a beautiful sinuous pattern which ran throughout the sword. Quite often this pattern could be interpreted (with imagination) as for example the marks on a vipers skin, a dragon, etc,etc, and therefore would be named
to suit the pattern. I sometimes think European martial arts are neglected in the same manner, Europe/Britain is rich with many diverse martial arts (and weapons, some very wierd), which rival any in the east. But thats another story

I've seen the modern versions of those swords on The Sword Forum and they are remarkable works of art. I've also heard the viking smiths would make runes from the different steels. Is this true?

Peter Seth 11-23-2004 05:45 AM

Re: Japanese sword on the History Channel
 
Yup!

batemanb 11-29-2004 01:27 AM

Re: Japanese sword on the History Channel
 
Just saw this over in the weapons section

http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showth...8088#post88088

rgds

Bryan


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