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NH 08-12-2004 04:55 PM

Did Ono-ha Itto Ryu influence Aikido sword?
 
Hi,

I was curious whether it has been ascertained exactly which schools of Kenjutsu influenced Morihei Ueshiba's Aikido sword techniques. I have heard he may have trained with some well-known schools in his earlier days, but this may just be rumours.

Is Ono-ha Itto Ryu known/believed to have influenced Aikido sword techniques?

Regards,

Nick Hallale
England

NH 08-12-2004 05:13 PM

Re: Origin of sword work in Aikido
 
Just to clarify the reason for the question: I am aware of the links between Daito Ryu and Ono-ha Itto Ryu and was wondering if any of that carried through to Aikido.

kironin 08-12-2004 05:36 PM

Re: Origin of sword work in Aikido
 
yes.

;)

Lyle Laizure 08-12-2004 11:45 PM

Re: Origin of sword work in Aikido
 
I believe he studied Yagu shinkage ryu as well as others.

kironin 08-13-2004 02:47 AM

Re: Origin of sword work in Aikido
 
Actually, the taigi 29 in Ki Society formulated by Koichi Tohei Sensei is kumi-tachi supposedly comes from Yagu shinkage ryu tradition. At least that's according to what a 9th dan told me who should know. It's not supposed to be demonstrated to the public by anyone lower than of Godan rank. It's fun though.

what little Ona-ha Itto Ryu Kenjutsu I have done was fun

if coming from these traditions, various Aiki-ken have mutated from these forms quite a bit.

L. Camejo 08-13-2004 07:43 AM

Re: Origin of sword work in Aikido
 
This is an interesting question, since I recently got a sort of mini-revelation when training under a Japanese 8th Dan who visited. He took apart our sword work and showed me how to do the basic bokken movements from the perspective of Ono Ha Itto Ryu. He was saying that the grip and striking techniques many of us use in Aiki-ken would not make sense if being viewed from the perspective of someone who knew how to use a sword and were really attacking, as it left too many openings for the Aikidoka to get off relatively easy technique. This, he said, may be good for Aikido practice, but not so good if we want to understand the basics of handling a sword.

Being one who emphasises effective technique, he showed us how to grip the bokken and execute the basic cuts Ono Ha Itto Ryu style and then show how the Aikido techniques should be applied (though modified very slightly to deal with the new grip and focus of the strikes) against this more effective, kenjutsu attack, instead of the attacks we normally use that make it easy to do Aikido technique against bokken.

I felt like a beginner at weapons work all over again, when I compare what we used to practice against what he had shown us, so I can now understand Craig's concept of mutation in what we often pass for good sword work in Aikido.

This of course has sprung a desire in me to learn Ono Ha Itto Ryu to get better insight into these principles and how they relate to Aikido. Of course, this ryu is also what S. Takeda studied and is also taught by one of the branches of Daito Ryu alongside the empty handed techniques if I'm not mistaken.

Gambatte.
LC:ai::ki:

Charles Hill 08-13-2004 01:05 PM

Re: Origin of sword work in Aikido
 
I have a short video of Kunii Sensei of the Kashima Shinryu and was struck by how similar he and Morihei Ueshiba moved with the sword. Kisshomaru Ueshiba studied the ryu and apparently showed his father what he had learned. Perhaps this was an influence as well.

Charles Hill

Chris Li 08-13-2004 03:51 PM

Re: Origin of sword work in Aikido
 
Quote:

Charles Hill wrote:
I have a short video of Kunii Sensei of the Kashima Shinryu and was struck by how similar he and Morihei Ueshiba moved with the sword. Kisshomaru Ueshiba studied the ryu and apparently showed his father what he had learned. Perhaps this was an influence as well.

Charles Hill

I'll note here that Kashima Shin Ryu and Kashima Shinto Ryu are two different schools. Kisshomaru trained with instructors from Kashima Shinto Ryu, and much of Morihei's swordwork from Iwama after the war resembles Kashima Shinto Ryu (although he never trained directly, he only observed classes).

Kashima Shin Ryu has links to Aikido through Seigo Yamaguchi, whose swordwork was influenced by the school, and through Minoru Inaba, who teaches a limited portion of the curriculum along with Aikido. There are no (to my knowledge) direct links to Morihei Ueshiba's swordwork.

Best,

Chris


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