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-   -   Dizzy (http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showthread.php?t=5430)

Gibby 04-26-2004 01:39 PM

Dizzy
 
I have been doing akidio for about the past 2/3 weeks, 3 times a week. I really enjoy the time at the Dojo. I recently started working on my front rolls, i have the rolls down pretty good, but when I stand up I get really dizzy and light headed. Is there a way to overcome this? Does it just happen with time?

Thanks.
Scott

otto 04-26-2004 01:56 PM

Re: Dizzy
 
Sounds like you're not breathing properly Scott , try not to hold your breath during the rolls....also , focusing on a far spot helped me overcome that nuisance...

Else , the usual....practice practice practice... :D

Gibby 04-26-2004 01:58 PM

Re: Dizzy
 
Ottoniel Ojeda
Thank you for your response, i do hold my breath

thanks again,
Scott

PeaceHeather 04-26-2004 03:55 PM

Re: Dizzy
 
I am prone to motion sickness and get dizzy, regardless of whether I breathe through the roll or not. Urgh.

Heather

Gibby 04-26-2004 06:00 PM

Re: Dizzy
 
Heather, I get motion sickness as well. I cant read in a car, i cant play alot of the 1st person video games. Has it gotten better for you? I have doing some research, I read that ginger root is great for helping over come motion sickness. Everything that I have read states its better then the leading motion sickness medications. I am going to pick some up this week, i will see how it works out....

Noel 04-26-2004 06:26 PM

Re: Dizzy
 
Best thing to cure dizzy is a lot of rolls on a regular basis, IMO. After each class, try and do twenty rolls as quickly as you can, without hurting yourself or someone else. You'll be dizzy as all heck the first few times, but it will improve.

-Noel

Benjie Lu 04-26-2004 07:05 PM

Re: Dizzy
 
I try to look up the ceiling whenever I stop rolling from our extended rolling drills. This helps me dissipate the dizzy feeling. Also taking a few deep breaths immediately after will help. And please don't stand up immediately if you feel dizzy because you might fall over and injure yourself. Wait awhile, I'm sure your instructors will understand for safety reasons.

As advised in the previous posts, practice will help you in reducing the dizzy feeling after rolling.

Hope this helps and keep on training! =)

PeaceHeather 04-26-2004 08:54 PM

Re: Dizzy
 
Hi Scott,

I'm a tiny bit better now that I'm older, but I'm still prone to motion sickness. I've never tried ginger root -- I do know that ingested ginger is good for settling the stomach, though.

One of my senseis repeated the advice a lot of folks here have given: training gets you used to it, and properly executed rolls seem to make you less dizzy than badly executed ones. So, roll a lot until you get used to it, I guess...

Heather

PeterR 04-26-2004 09:27 PM

Re: Dizzy
 
I met a guy who researched motion sickness for the Canadian Space program - he had this machine that flipped cats around and a larger one built for himself and his human subjects. Apparently D2O and Alcohol are quite good preventing it.

D2O is expensive, answer train drunk. <---- humor.

Serious answer - don't role a lot. Role until you start to become dizzy and then a couple more. No need to get sick and ruin the rest of your practice. During general practice you do roles much less frequently allowing your equilibrium to recover.

aikidoc 04-27-2004 10:13 AM

Re: Dizzy
 
My wife just started aikido and she takes a couple of dramamine before class. Seems to help.

justinm 04-27-2004 10:36 AM

Re: Dizzy
 
I suffer from very bad motion sickness. Once the nausea has set in it can take several hours for me to recover. I'd agree with Peter - do enough to start to get a little dizzy but do not overdo it. Build it up over time - it does get better.

The bad news for me is that it gets worse again if I reduce the number of rolls so it is not a permament fix. Just have to keep training :)

Justin

Gibby 04-27-2004 12:56 PM

Re: Dizzy
 
Thanks all, we will see how things go tonight!!

PeaceHeather 04-27-2004 01:16 PM

Re: Dizzy
 
As a side note -- dramamine is *evil*. I don't know if it's the caffeine included in some motion sickness pills, or if it's the mental thing of "oh jeez I hope I don't get sick", but I have found myself nauseous *after* taking dramamine, but *before* starting the motion that would otherwise cause dizziness.

Evil.

Heather

aikidoc 04-27-2004 02:48 PM

Re: Dizzy
 
If you can't take Dramamine there are other options: some take ginger; others take scopalomine (prescription).

PeterR 04-27-2004 06:02 PM

Re: Dizzy
 
Quote:

John Riggs wrote:
If you can't take Dramamine there are other options: some take ginger; others take scopalomine (prescription).

Does Dramamine affect your ability to balance? I was joking about the alcohol - very wary about taking drugs of any sort onto the mat.

aikidoc 04-27-2004 09:14 PM

Re: Dizzy
 
Dramamine is an over the counter car sickness tablet. It shouldn't be a problem on the mat other than some people might get a little drowsy.

PeterR 04-27-2004 09:21 PM

Re: Dizzy
 
Thanks John;

Still drowsy on the mat is not a good idea. Stand by the contention that it is better to adjust your training than to pop pills.

PeaceHeather 04-27-2004 09:31 PM

Re: Dizzy
 
Quote:

John Riggs wrote:
Dramamine is an over the counter car sickness tablet. It shouldn't be a problem on the mat other than some people might get a little drowsy.

If I remember right, some imitation versions of dramamine contain caffeine, possibly to speed up the drug's effect -- but that's why I keep remembering that dramamine makes me jittery and nauseous. If you're up for an experiment, perhaps having a coffee before practice will be helpful for you, without giving you as strong a dosage as the pill would.

Huh. Just did a little research... the main ingredient in Benadryl is one of the same four main ingredients likely to be found in most other over-the-counter medicines for motion sickness -- they're all antihistamines, including Dramamine. Who knew?

http://www.fda.gov/fdac/reprints/tummy.html

Info on the four main ingredients used.
Heather

aikidoc 04-27-2004 11:15 PM

Re: Dizzy
 
Peter. Agree on taking pills but it's better than hurling on the mat :)

PeterR 04-27-2004 11:35 PM

Re: Dizzy
 
Quote:

John Riggs wrote:
Peter. Agree on taking pills but it's better than hurling on the mat :)

What a horrible image. I can just imagine the carnage.

Just taking this off on a bit of a tangent but generally how inclusive does one have to be for various infirmities.

I like to think I am quite accommodating and do allow quite a bit of flexibility with respect to intensity of training but I would consider Aikido to be not for everyone.

With respect to dizziness - if it really is that bad should you be doing Aikido. Same thing with blindness, hemophilia, etc. Questions of can I safely teach you, will your involvement negatively affect the training of me and my students, come to mind.

happysod 04-28-2004 06:41 AM

Re: Dizzy
 
Quote:

how inclusive does one have to be for various infirmities
joining the thread hijack here - difficult one, I go on the rule that, if they stick it, so will I, as long as the other students aren't neglected as a consequence.

I won't pander to any physical disability beyond what help is needed to adapt any particular technique and (so far) the students who have some learning difficulties may have initially needed more instruction, but seem to have come up to speed nicely.

John, would you consider hurling an atemi (sorry couldn't resist :) )

foad 04-28-2004 07:48 AM

Re: Dizzy
 
I had the same problem, and i solve it with focusing on one spot from the begging to the end of roll.
But the best way is just to practice them all the time because there is no advanced aikido without rolls/ukemi.

PeterR 04-28-2004 08:33 PM

Re: Dizzy
 
Quote:

foad wrote:
I had the same problem, and i solve it with focusing on one spot from the begging to the end of roll.
But the best way is just to practice them all the time because there is no advanced aikido without rolls/ukemi.

The Shodokan system is actually very gentle with respect to roles and ukemi.

First test - ushiro and yoko ukemi (no rolling at all).
Second test - forward roll from kneeling
Third test (about nine months into training) forward role from standing.

Most of our ukemi really is ushiro (without the roles).

So when I returned back to Canada I joined an Aikikai dojo that was role happy (in my view). I could do the roles fine but also got dizzy. Got over it though. Still don't think that you particularily need roles to do advanced Aikido - although you certainly need to be competent at certain other types of ukemi.


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